(202421) 2005 UQ513

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(202421) 2005 UQ513
Discovery[2]
Discovered by M. E. Brown
D. L. Rabinowitz
C. A. Trujillo
Discovery date 21 October 2005[1]
Designations
MPC designation (202421) 2005 UQ513
Cubewano (MPC)[3]
ScatExt (DES)[4]
Orbital characteristics[1][5]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 8474 days (23.20 yr)
Aphelion 49.689 AU (7.4334 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 36.713 AU (5.4922 Tm) (q)
43.201 AU (6.4628 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.15018 (e)
283.95 yr (103713 d)
223.93° (M)
0° 0m 12.496s / day (n)
Inclination 25.7315° (i)
307.8679° (Ω)
221.89° (ω)
Earth MOID 35.763 AU (5.3501 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 31.568 AU (4.7225 Tm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 5.253
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 498+63
−75
 km
[6]
7.03 h (0.293 d)
7.03 hr?[1]
20.8 [7]
3.4 ± 0.37743[1]

(202421) 2005 UQ513, also written as 2005 UQ513, is a cubewano with an absolute magnitude of 3.4.[1] Mike Brown's website lists it as a highly likely dwarf planet.[8] (202421) 2005 UQ513's spectrum has a weak signature of absorption by water ice.[9] Like Quaoar,[10] it has a very[10] red spectrum,[11][12] which indicates that its surface probably contains a lot of complex, processed organic molecules.[11] Its light curve shows variations of Δm=0.3 mag, but no period has been determined.[12]

Classification[edit]

(202421) 2005 UQ513 has a perihelion of 37.3 AU.[1] The Minor Planet Center (MPC) classifies it as a cubewano[3] while the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) classifies it as ScatExt (scattered-extended).[4] Although dynamically it would have been a good candidate to be a member of the Haumea collisional family, given its red spectrum, it is not.[11][12]

Distance[edit]

It is currently 48.8 AU from the Sun.[7] It will come to perihelion around 2123.[1]

It has been observed 194 times over 14 oppositions with precovery images back to 1990.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2005 UQ513)" (2011-12-26 last obs., 12 opp). Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "MPEC 2007-R02 : 2003 UY413, 2003 UZ413, 2004 NT33, 2005 CA79, 2005 CB79, 2005 UQ513". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2007-09-01. Bibcode:2007MPEC....R...02B. Retrieved 2009-08-26. 
  3. ^ a b "MPEC 2010-S44 : DISTANT MINOR PLANETS (2010 OCT. 11.0 TT)". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2010-09-25. Retrieved 2011-01-26. 
  4. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 202421" (2012/05/06 using 59 observations). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2012-05-05. 
  5. ^ "AstDyS (202421) 2005UQ513 Orbital information". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2012-05-05. 
  6. ^ TNOs are Cool: A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. X. Analysis of classical Kuiper belt objects from Herschel* and Spitzer observations p. 18
  7. ^ a b "AstDyS (202421) 2005UQ513 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2012-05-05. 
  8. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2013-11-30. 
  9. ^ Ragozzine, D. & Brown, M. E. (2007). "Candidate Members and Age Estimate of the Family of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61". The Astronomical Journal 134 (6): 2160–2167. arXiv:0709.0328. Bibcode:2007AJ....134.2160R. doi:10.1086/522334. Retrieved 2009-12-05. 
  10. ^ a b Trujillo, C. A., Sheppard, S. S., & Schaller E. L. (2011). A Photometric System for Detection of Water and Methane Ices on Kuiper Belt Objects
  11. ^ a b c Pinilla-Alonso, N., Licandro, J., & Lorenzi, V. (2008). Visible spectroscopy in the neighborhood of 2003 EL61 (Haumea)
  12. ^ a b c Snodgrass, C., Carry, B., Dumas, C., & Hainaut, O. (2009). Characterisation of candidate members of (136108) Haumea’s family

External links[edit]