(251732) 1998 HG49

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(251732) 1998 HG49
Discovery[1][2]
Discovered by Spacewatch from Kitt Peak
Discovery date 27 April 1998
Designations
MPC designation 1998 HG49
Amor[1]
Orbital characteristics[1][3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 6175 days (16.91 yr)
Aphelion 1.33569371 AU (199.816935 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 1.0654426 AU (159.38794 Gm) (q)
1.20056815 AU (179.602439 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.1125514 (e)
1.32 yr (480.48 d)
11.052123° (M)
0° 44m 57.282s / day (n)
Inclination 4.1953173° (i)
44.832211° (Ω)
324.26152° (ω)
Earth MOID 0.0755827 AU (11.30701 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.88966 AU (581.885 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 5.286
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 0.13–0.29 km[2]
21.7[1] or 21.8[2]

(251732) 1998 HG49, also written as (251732) 1998 HG49, is an asteroid on a low-eccentricity and low-inclination orbit between the orbits of Earth and Mars. This is within a region of stability where bodies may survive for the age of the Solar System, and hence it may have formed near its current orbit.[4]

It is classified as an Amor asteroid[1] because its perihelion is less than 1.3 AU and does not cross Earth's orbit.

Between 1900 and 2200 its closest approach to Earth is more than 0.14 AU.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 251732 (1998 HG49)". 30 November 2010. Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c NeoDys-2 Retrieved 2011-09-05
  3. ^ AstDys-2 Retrieved 2011-09-05
  4. ^ Evans, N. W. & Tabachnik, S. (1999). Possible long-lived asteroid belts in the inner Solar System. Nature.
  5. ^ JPL close-approach data Retrieved 2011-09-05

External links[edit]