(26375) 1999 DE9

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(26375) 1999 DE9
Discovery
Discovered by Chadwick A. Trujillo and
Jane X. Luu
Discovery date 20 February 1999
Designations
MPC designation (26375) 1999 DE9
TNO
2:5 resonance[1]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 2
Observation arc 6619 days (18.12 yr)
Aphelion 79.663 AU (11.9174 Tm)
Perihelion 32.342 AU (4.8383 Tm)
56.002 AU (8.3778 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.42249
419.10 yr (153075 d)
3.81 km/s
25.385°
0° 0m 8.466s / day
Inclination 7.6076°
322.909°
160.236°
Earth MOID 31.3582 AU (4.69112 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 27.062 AU (4.0484 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 461 ± 45 km[3]
24 h (1.0 d)
0.06–0.08[3]
Temperature ≈37 K
5.0

(26375) 1999 DE9 (also written (26375) 1999 DE9) is a trans-Neptunian object. Light-curve-amplitude analysis shows only small deviations, suggesting (26375) 1999 DE9 is a spheroid with small albedo spots.[4] Measurements by the Spitzer Space Telescope estimate that it is 461 ± 45 km in diameter.[3] It was discovered in 1999 by Chad Trujillo and Jane X. Luu. It is possibly a dwarf planet.[5]

(26375) 1999 DE9 orbit is in 2:5 resonance with Neptune's.[1] Spectral analysis has shown traces of ice.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2008-03-14). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 26375". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2008-09-24. 
  2. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 26375 (1999 DE9)". NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 5 April 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c Stansberry, Grundy, Brown, Spencer, Trilling, Cruikshank, Luc Margot Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope (2007) arXiv:astro-ph/0702538
  4. ^ Tancredi, G., & Favre, S. (2008) Which are the dwarfs in the Solar System?. Depto. Astronomía, Fac. Ciencias, Montevideo, Uruguay; Observatorio Astronómico Los Molinos, MEC, Uruguay. Retrieved August 10, 2011
  5. ^ Icy Dwarf Planets and TNOs
  6. ^ Fig 3 for 1999 DE9

External links[edit]