(31345) 1998 PG

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(31345) 1998 PG
Orbit of 31345
Discovery
Discovered by LONEOS
Discovery date 3 August 1998
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 13601 days (37.24 yr)
Aphelion 2.8041 AU (419.49 Gm)
Perihelion 1.2264 AU (183.47 Gm)
2.0153 AU (301.48 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.39143
2.86 yr (1045.0 d)
8.9514°
0° 20m 40.236s / day
Inclination 6.4937°
222.79°
155.93°
Known satellites 1
Earth MOID 0.232976 AU (34.8527 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.66484 AU (398.654 Gm)
Proper orbital elements
125.7425 deg / yr
2.86299 yr
(1045.708 d)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 900 m (3,000 ft)[2]
2.51620 h (0.104842 d)[1][3]
0.16[2]
Temperature 188 K (-85°C)
Q
17.3[1][2]

(31345) 1998 PG is an Amor near-Earth asteroid discovered by the LONEOS program on August 3, 1998. It is known to have a moon, S/2001 (31345) 1.[4]

Status as a Near-Earth Object[edit]

1998 PG is classified as an Amor asteroid. It has made multiple close approaches to Earth, with the closest being 35,648,680 kilometres (22,151,060 mi) on 15 October 1978.[1]

Moon[edit]

Table Mountain Observatory, where S/2001 (31345) 1 was discovered.
The 1998 PG system compared to other binary asteroids.

1998 PG has a single moon, S/2001 (31345) 1. The moon was discovered at the Table Mountain Observatory by analyzing observations from 29 August to 25 October 1998. S/2001 (31345) 1 has a size of 300 metres (980 ft), one-third the size of the asteroid itself, and orbits every 14 hours with a semi-major axis of 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi).[2] From the surface of 1998 PG, the moon would have an angular diameter of about 16.3°.[a] For comparison, the Sun appears to be 0.5° from Earth.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Calculated by solving .

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "(31345) 1998 PG orbit diagram". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 2031345. Retrieved 5 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d Johnston, W. R. (1 September 2005). "(31345) 1998 PG". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  3. ^ Pravec, P.; et al. (2000). "Two-Period Lightcurves of 1996 FG3, 1998 PG, and (5407) 1992 AX: One Probable and Two Possible Binary Asteroids". Icarus. 146 (1): 190–200. Bibcode:2000Icar..146..190P. doi:10.1006/icar.2000.6375. 
  4. ^ Lance, B. (6 August 2013). "Binary and Ternary Near-Earth Asteroids Detected by Radar". JPL/NASA. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]