(315898) 2008 QD4

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(315898) 2008 QD4
Centaur-2008QD4-LB1-15min.jpg
Centaur 2008 QD4 (apmag 19) as seen with 24" telescope
Discovery
Discovery date 25 August 2008
Designations
MPC designation (315898) 2008 QD4
Centaur[1][2][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 1
Observation arc 2744 days (7.51 yr)
Aphelion 11.364 AU (1.7000 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 5.4531 AU (815.77 Gm) (q)
8.4087 AU (1.25792 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.35149 (e)
24.38 yr (8906.16 d)
79.666° (M)
0° 2m 25.516s / day (n)
Inclination 42.028° (i)
344.70° (Ω)
68.923° (ω)
Earth MOID 4.6941 AU (702.23 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.46448 AU (219.083 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.387
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 31 km[4]
0.05 (assumed)[4]
11.4[1]

(315898) 2008 QD4, also written as (315898) 2008 QD4, is a centaur with a perihelion greater than Jupiter and a semi-major axis less than Saturn.

Perihelion[edit]

(315898) 2008 QD4 is listed as a centaur by the Minor Planet Center (MPC),[3] JPL,[1] and the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES).[2] Of numbered objects listed as a centaur by all 3 major institutions, (315898) 2008 QD4 has the smallest perihelion distance.[3]

It came to perihelion in August 2010.[1]

Of objects listed as a centaur by all 3 major institutions, (315898) 2008 QD4 has the smallest perihelion distance. Due to a 41° orbital inclination, it is above the ecliptic plane when crossing Jupiters orbit, and below the ecliptic when crossing Saturns orbit.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2008 QD4)" (last observation: 2008-10-08). Retrieved 8 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2008-10-01). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 08QD4". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2008-10-17. 
  3. ^ a b c "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2008-10-17. 
  4. ^ a b assumed to have an albedo just above a typical comet

External links[edit]