(4489) 1988 AK

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(4489) 1988 AK
Discovery [1]
Discovered by E. Bowell
Discovery site Lowell Obs.
Discovery date 15 January 1988
Designations
MPC designation (4489) 1988 AK
1988 AK · 1980 KA1
1989 AQ1
Jupiter trojan[2][3]
(Greek camp)[4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 36.05 yr (13,167 days)     
Aphelion 5.5225 AU
Perihelion 4.9233 AU
5.2229 AU
Eccentricity 0.0574
11.94 yr (4,360 days)
124.02°
0° 4m 57.36s / day
Inclination 22.210°
86.554°
7.6676°
Jupiter MOID 0.187 AU
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.8480
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 76.60±0.41 km[5]
92.85 km (derived)[3]
92.93±7.4 km (IRAS:14)[1]
95.02±2.47 km[6]
12.582±0.001 h[7]
12.6±0.01 h[8]
16.25±0.03 h[9]
0.0469 (derived)[3]
0.050±0.003[6]
0.0514±0.009 (IRAS:14)[1]
0.069±0.005[5]
D[10] · C[3]
9.00[6]
9.1[1][3][5]
9.12±0.22[10]

(4489) 1988 AK is a rare-type Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 92 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by American astronomer Edward Bowell at the U.S. Anderson Mesa Station, Arizona, on 15 January 1988.[2]

On December 18, 2012, 4489 has occulted the star TYC 2467-00054-1 over parts of the United States.[11] 1988 AK's level of brightness equals magnitude 16.1 and the star's 11.1.[11]

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2010 were used to build a light curve showing a rotation period of 12.582 ± 0.004 hours with a brightness variation of 0.22 ± 0.01 magnitude.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 4489 (1988 AK)" (2016-06-04 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved June 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "4489 (1988 AK)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved June 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (4489)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved June 2016. 
  4. ^ "List of Jupiter Trojans". Minor Planet Center. 20 June 2016. Retrieved June 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. 
  6. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey" (PDF). Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. 
  7. ^ Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel, R.; French, Linda M. (January 2016). "Large L5 Jovian Trojan Asteroid Lightcurves from the Center for Solar System Studies". The Minor Planet Bulletin 43 (1): 15–22. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43...15S. ISSN 1052-8091. 
  8. ^ French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; Lederer, Susan M.; Coley, Daniel R.; Rohl, Derrick A. (April 2011). "Preliminary Results from a Study of Trojan Asteroids". The Minor Planet Bulletin 38 (2): 116–120. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..116F. ISSN 1052-8091. 
  9. ^ a b Mottola, Stefano; Di Martino, Mario; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carbognani, Albino; Carsenty, Uri; et al. (May 2011). "Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojans. I. Light Curves of 80 Objects". The Astronomical Journal 141 (5): 32. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..170M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/5/170. 
  10. ^ a b Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. 
  11. ^ a b Asteroid Occultation Updates

External links[edit]