(505478) 2013 UT15

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(505478) 2013 UT15
Discovery [1]
Discovered by OSSOS
Discovery site Mauna Kea Obs.
Discovery date 2 August 2013
Designations
MPC designation (505478) 2013 UT15
2013 UT15
TNO[1] · SDO[2]
detached · distant[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc 4.08 yr (1,489 days)
Aphelion 347.97 AU
Perihelion 43.853 AU
195.91 AU
Eccentricity 0.7762
2742.19 yr (1,001,586 days)
353.50°
0° 0m 1.44s / day
Inclination 10.682°
191.97°
252.40°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 243 km estimate)[2]
260 km (est. at 0.08)[4]
340 km estimate)[5]
0.04 (estimate)[5]
0.09 (assumed)[2]
BB (estimate)[5]
6.2951[1] · 6.4[5]

(505478) 2013 UT15 is an extreme trans-Neptunian object from the scattered disc, located in the outermost regions of the Solar System, approximately 260 kilometers (160 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 2 August 2013, by astronomers of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey at Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii, United States.[3]

Orbit[edit]

With a semi-major axis of 196 AU, 2013 UT15 orbits the Sun at a distance of 43.9–348 AU once every 2,742 years. Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.78 and an inclination of 11° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] It has a similar orbit to (148209) 2000 CR105, except for a smaller inclination.

2013 UT15 belongs to a small number of detached objects with perihelion distances of 30 AU or more, and semi-major axes of 150 AU or more.[6] Such objects can not reach such orbits without some perturbing object, which lead to the speculation of planet nine.

Physical characteristics[edit]

Spectral type[edit]

The object is estimated to have a bluish spectra (BB).[5]

Diameter[edit]

2013 UT15 has been estimated to measure 243 and 340 kilometers in diameter, based on an assumed albedo of 0.09 and 0.04, respectively.[2][5] A generic magnitude-to-diameter conversion gives a mean-diameter of 260 kilometers,[4] using with a typical albedo of 0.08 and a published absolute magnitude of 6.2951.[1]

Numbering and naming[edit]

2013 UT15 was numbered (505478) by the Minor Planet Center on 4 November 2017 (M.P.C. 107067).[7] As of 2017, this minor planet has not received a name.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 505478 (2013 UT15)" (2017-08-30 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d Wm. Robert Johnston (15 October 2017). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "505478 (2013 UT15)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Asteroid Size Estimator". CNEOS – NASA/JPL. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". Gps.caltech.edu. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  6. ^ minorplanetcenter.net: q>30, a>150
  7. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 10 November 2017.

External links[edit]