(5646) 1990 TR

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(5646) 1990 TR
Discovery [1]
Discovered by S. Ueda
H. Kaneda
Discovery site Kushiro Obs. (399)
Discovery date 11 October 1990
Designations
MPC designation (5646) 1990 TR
1990 TR
Amor · NEO[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 26.75 yr (9,769 days)
Aphelion 3.0792 AU
Perihelion 1.2071 AU
2.1431 AU
Eccentricity 0.4368
3.14 yr (1,146 days)
155.77°
0° 18m 50.76s / day
Inclination 7.9142°
14.136°
335.68°
Known satellites 1 [3][4]
Earth MOID 0.2105 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.03±0.52 km[5]
2.30 km (derived)[6]
2.50±0.05 km[7]
2.723±0.525 km[8]
4.3 km (dated)[1]
3.1999±0.0002 h[3]
3.204±0.002 h[9]
6.25 h[10]
0.18 (assumed)[6]
0.19±0.03[7]
0.454±0.194[8][11]
0.65±0.43[5]
0.66±0.42[12]
SMASS = U [1]
Q[13] · S[14] · U [6]
14.3[8] · 15.00[14] · 15.4[1] · 15.45[7] · 15.67[6][10]

(5646) 1990 TR is a probable rare-type binary[4] asteroid classified as near-Earth object of the Amor group, approximately 2.3 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 11 October 1990, by Japanese astronomers Seiji Ueda and Hiroshi Kaneda at Kushiro Observatory (399) near Kushiro, in eastern Hokkaido, Japan.[2]

Orbit[edit]

The asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.2–3.1 AU once every 3 years and 2 months (1,146 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.44 and an inclination of 8° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins with its first observation at the Siding Spring Observatory, five months prior to its official discovery observation at Kushiro.[2]

Lightcurve[edit]

In December 2012, the so far best rated rotational lightcurve was obtained by American astronomer Brian Warner at his Palmer Divide Observatory in Colorado. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 3.1999 hours with a brightness variation of 0.12 magnitude (U=3). Photometric observations also gave a period of 19.47 hours for a probable asteroid moon, with a measured diameter-ratio of 0.18±0.02, which translates into a diameter of 400 meters for its moon.[3]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the surveys carried out by the Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, the asteroid measures 2.03 and 2.723 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.19 and 0.66.[5][7][8][11] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.18 and derives a diameter of 2.3 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 15.67.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 5646 (1990 TR)" (2017-01-30 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c "5646 (1990 TR)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c Warner, Brian D. (April 2013). "Seeing Double Old and New: Observations and Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory of Six Binary Asteroids". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (2): 94–98. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40...94W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (2013-11-18). "Binary and Ternary near-Earth Asteroids detected by radar". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2014-03-01. 
  5. ^ a b c Mueller, Michael; Delbo', M.; Hora, J. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; et al. (April 2011). "ExploreNEOs. III. Physical Characterization of 65 Potential Spacecraft Target Asteroids". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (4): 9. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..109M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/4/109. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (5646)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c d Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; et al. (September 2016). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astronomical Journal. 152 (3): 12. arXiv:1606.08923Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016AJ....152...63N. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/3/63. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  9. ^ Warner, Brian D. (April 2016). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2015 October-December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (2): 143–154. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..143W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  10. ^ a b Wisniewski, Wieslaw Z. (December 1992). "The unusual lightcurve of 1990 TR". In Lunar and Planetary Inst. Bibcode:1992acm..proc..653W. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (December 2011). "NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 743 (2): 17. arXiv:1109.6400Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...743..156M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/2/156. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  12. ^ Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, D. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Benner, L. A. M.; et al. (September 2011). "ExploreNEOs. V. Average Albedo by Taxonomic Complex in the Near-Earth Asteroid Population". The Astronomical Journal. 142 (3): 12. Bibcode:2011AJ....142...85T. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  13. ^ Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbó, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael (January 2014). "Physical characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed near-Earth objects". Icarus. 228: 217–246. Bibcode:2014Icar..228..217T. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.10.004. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  14. ^ a b Carry, B.; Solano, E.; Eggl, S.; DeMeo, F. E. (April 2016). "Spectral properties of near-Earth and Mars-crossing asteroids using Sloan photometry". Icarus. 268: 340–354. Bibcode:2016Icar..268..340C. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.047. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 

External links[edit]