(7474) 1992 TC

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(7474) 1992 TC
Discovery
Discovered by McNaught, R. H.
Discovery site Siding Spring
Discovery date 1 October 1992
Designations
MPC designation 7474
1992 TC
Orbital characteristics[1]
1992 TC orbital diagram.jpg
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 9008 days (24.66 yr)
Aphelion 2.023428544361125 AU (302.70060175002 Gm)
Perihelion 1.107744504781589 AU (165.71621919495 Gm)
1.565586524571357 AU (234.20841047248 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.2924412113952760
1.96 yr (715.51 d)
319.6698827668740°
0° 30m 11.302s / day
Inclination 7.087399865368700°
88.65316330200990°
275.5510819132080°
Earth MOID 0.166416 AU (24.8955 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.44236 AU (514.970 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 670–1500 meters[2]
5.540 h (0.2308 d)
X
18.0[1]

7474 (1992 TC) is a moderate sized M-type asteroid discovered by Robert H. McNaught in 1992. It is notably one of a few similar M-type asteroids, including the named asteroids 4660 Nereus and 65803 Didymos, which can be reached easily by spacecraft from Earth. The delta-V required to reach 7474 (1992 TC) would be about 5.6 kilometres per second (3.5 mi/s),[3] which is less than is needed to reach the moon. M-type asteroids are thought to be composed primarily of nickel and iron, which if proven to be true means that 7474 (1992 TC) may one day become an important source of raw materials in space.

With an absolute magnitude of 18.0,[1] the asteroid is about 670–1500 meters in diameter.[2] On 2031-Aug-11 the asteroid will pass 0.085 AU (12,700,000 km; 7,900,000 mi) from Mars.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 7474 (1992 TC)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 4 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Retrieved 2014-06-25. 
  3. ^ "Delta-v for spacecraft rendezvous with all known near-Earth asteroids". 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-07. 

External links[edit]