(7888) 1993 UC

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(7888) 1993 UC
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Robert H. McNaught
Discovery date 20 October 1993
Designations
none
Apollo NEO[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Aphelion 4.0540 AU (606.47 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 0.81827 AU (122.411 Gm) (q)
2.4361 AU (364.44 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.66411 (e)
3.80 yr (1388.8 d)
274.28° (M)
Inclination 26.082° (i)
165.92° (Ω)
323.07° (ω)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~2.7 km (1.7 mi)[2]
Equatorial escape velocity
~1.3 m/s (3 mph)
2.340 h (0.0975 d)[1]
U
14.1 (2013 peak)[3]
15.1[1]

(7888) 1993 UC is a near-Earth minor planet in the Apollo group.[1] It was discovered by Robert H. McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Coonabarabran, New South Wales, Australia, on October 20, 1993.[1] The asteroid has an observation arc of 23 years and has a well determined orbit.[1] Its estimated size is 2.3 to 5.2 km.[4]

On March 20, 2013, the asteroid passed 49 lunar distances or 0.12598 AU (18,846,000 km; 11,711,000 mi) from Earth at a relative velocity of 21.8 km/s (49,000 mph).[1] The approach posed no threat to Earth. (7888) 1993 UC is not classified as a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA) because its Earth MOID (Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance) is only 0.089 AU,[1] and only objects with an Earth MOID less than 0.05 AU are considered PHAs.[5]

It was discovered to be a binary asteroid by Arecibo Observatory in March 2013.[6]

On April 29, 2146, the asteroid will pass 0.0346 AU (5,180,000 km; 3,220,000 mi) from asteroid 4 Vesta.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "JPL Close-Approach Data: 7888 (1993 UC)". Retrieved 11 April 2016. 2012-11-25 last obs (arc=23 years) 
  2. ^ (E.A.R.N.) physical data for (7888) 1993UC
  3. ^ "1993 UC Ephemerides for 20 March 2013". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 2013-03-19. 
  4. ^ NASA "NEO Earth Close Approach Tables", Retrieved on 21 December 2012.
  5. ^ NASA/JPL "NEO Program FAQ", Retrieved on 21 December 2012.
  6. ^ Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (2013-11-18). "Binary and Ternary near-Earth Asteroids detected by radar". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2014-03-01. 

External links[edit]