.475 Wildey Magnum

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.475 Wildey Magnum
Wildey Cartridges.JPG
.44 Auto Mag, .45 Winchester Magnum, .45 Wildey Magnum, .475 Wildey Magnum.
Type Pistol
Place of origin USA
Production history
Designer Winchester
Designed 1977
Manufacturer Wildey
Produced 1984-Present[1]
Specifications
Parent case .284 Winchester
Case type Rebated Rim
Bullet diameter .475 in (12.1 mm)
Neck diameter .493 in (12.5 mm)
Base diameter .501 in (12.7 mm)
Rim diameter .473 in (12.0 mm)
Rim thickness .040 in (1.0 mm)
Case length 1.198 in (30.4 mm)
Overall length 1.575 in (40.0 mm)
Case capacity 38 gr H2O (2.5 cm3)
Primer type LP
Maximum CUP 50,000 CUP
Ballistic performance
Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy
250 gr (16 g) SP 1,850 ft/s (560 m/s) 1,900 ft·lbf (2,600 J)
300 gr (19 g) SP 1,610 ft/s (490 m/s) 1,727 ft·lbf (2,341 J)

The .475 Wildey Magnum is a semi-automatic pistol cartridge designed for big game hunting in the Wildey pistol.

History[edit]

The .475 Wildey Magnum was designed to be a hunting round. Cases are formed from .284 Winchester brass with the neck opened to take a .475" bullet, and the length is the same as the .45 Winchester Magnum. Velocity at 100 yards is equivalent to the muzzle velocity of the .44 Magnum.[2][3][4][5]

Popular media[edit]

While not being very common, the .475 Wildey Magnum is most famous for its appearance in Death Wish 3, where the Wildey (chambered for this cartridge) was a signature weapon of Paul Kersey, a character portrayed by Charles Bronson in the Death Wish film series.

Additional Wildey calibers[edit]

In the late 1980s, Wildey, Inc. produced three additional calibers using necked down versions of the .475 Wildey Magnum brass casing originally designed in 1983 in order to achieve higher velocities and muzzle energies.[6] First was the .357 Wildey Magnum (also known as the .357 Peterbuilt) which used a .357 Magnum bullet. Second was the .41 Wildey Magnum (also known as the 10 mm Wildey Magnum) which used a .41 Magnum bullet. Last was the .44 Wildey Magnum (also known as the 11 mm Wildey Magnum) which used a .44 Magnum bullet.[7] All calibers were eventually discontinued.

The .45 Wildey Magnum was introduced by Wildey F.A., Inc. in 1997, which is also a necked down version of the .475 Wildey Magnum using a .45 ACP bullet. It was discontinued in 2011 when overall productions ceased.[8]

Listed below is the ballistic performances of each produced cartridge as fired from a 10 in (254 mm) barrel. The information on the .45 Wildey Magnum is from a 12 in (305 mm) barrel. Bullet types were not provided.[7][9]

Caliber Bullet Weight Velocity Energy
.357 Wildey Magnum 125 gr (8.1 g) 2,300 ft/s (701 m/s) 1,468 ft·lbf (1,989 J)
.357 Wildey Magnum 158 gr (10.2 g) 2,060 ft/s (638 m/s) 1,489 ft·lbf (2,018 J)
.41 Wildey Magnum 200 gr (13 g) 1,842 ft/s (561 m/s) 1,507 ft·lbf (2,042 J)
.41 Wildey Magnum 220 gr (14.25 g) 1,733 ft/s (528 m/s) 1,467 ft·lbf (1,988 J)
.44 Wildey Magnum 200 gr (13 g) 1,980 ft/s (603 m/s) 1,741 ft·lbf (2,359 J)
.44 Wildey Magnum 240 gr (15.5 g) 1,747 ft/s (532 m/s) 1,626 ft·lbf (2,203 J)
.45 Wildey Magnum 230 gr (14.9 g) 1,730 ft/s (527 m/s) 1,485 ft·lbf (2,013 J)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes, 14th Edition, Gun Digest Books, 2014, Krause Publications, page 328, Retrieved Jan. 13, 2016.
  2. ^ Hartink, A.E. (2003). The Complete Encyclopedia of Pistols and Revolvers. Edison, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc. pp. 375–376. ISBN 978-0-7858-1871-7. 
  3. ^ "The Wildey Features:". wildeyguns.com. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  4. ^ "475 Wildey Magnum". reloadbench.com. Retrieved 31 October 2013. [self-published source]
  5. ^ ".475 Wildey Magnum Reloading Data". loaddata.com. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  6. ^ Guns America, Wildey Survivor .45 Winchester Magnum, Retrieved Jan. 14, 2016.
  7. ^ a b AMT Guns, The World's Most Powerful Rifles & Handguns by Robert Adam (1991), Retrieved Jan. 12, 2016.
  8. ^ The American Handgunner, Web Blast: The .44 Automag by John Taffin, February 2008, Retrieved Jan. 12, 2016.
  9. ^ Wildey Guns, Ballistics for the Wildey Pistols, Retrieved Jan. 12, 2016.

External links[edit]