0s BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
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This article concerns the period between 9 BC and 1 BC, the last nine years of the before Christ era. It is one of the two "0-to-9" decade-like timespans (along with 0s AD) that contain 9 years, and are not decades (10 years).

This is a list of events occurring in the 0s BC ordered by year.

Events[edit]

9 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

8 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

7 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

6 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

5 BC[edit]

4 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

3 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

2 BC[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

Parthia[edit]

1 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • Estimated birth of Jesus, in the Christian religion, as assigned by Dionysius Exiguus in his Anno Domini era; according to most scholars, Dionysius used the word "incarnation", but it is not known whether he meant conception or birth.[6][7] However, at least one scholar thinks Dionysius placed the incarnation of Jesus in the next year, AD 1.[6][7] Most modern scholars do not consider Dionysius' calculations authoritative, themselves placing the event several years earlier (see Chronology of Jesus).[8]

Significant people[edit]

Albrecht Altdorfer's painting the Adoration of the Magi (made ca. 1530) is one of several works of art concerning the Navity of Jesus. Though Jesus's exact birthdate is unknown (other than it would have occurred sometime during this decade)[9]

Births[edit]

9 BC

8 BC

7 BC

  • Possible birthdate of John the Baptist,[10] according to appearance of a very bright triple conjunction of the royal star Jupiter and Saturn in the sign of Pisces (land in the West) in May until December of that year since 854 years, with a retrogradation and stationing in November 12, 7 BC. Jesus was born on Saturday April 17, 6 BC / 17.4.748 AUC / 29 Nisan 3755 HC[11]

6 BC

5 BC

4 BC

  • c. Possible months being June or October (due to convergence of Jupiter and Saturn forming the star of Bethlehem at his birth) – Jesus, Son of God who becomes the central figure of messianic Israelites and Christianity (executed circa AD 30).
  • Approximate date – Seneca the Younger, Córdoban-born Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman and dramatist (forced suicide AD 65)

3 BC

2 BC


Deaths[edit]

9 BC

8 BC

7 BC

6 BC

5 BC

4 BC

3 BC

2 BC

1 BC


References[edit]

  1. ^ "LacusCurtius • Res Gestae Divi Augusti (II)". penelope.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-22.
  2. ^ "LacusCurtius • Res Gestae Divi Augusti (II)". penelope.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-22.
  3. ^ a b Matthews, Roberts (2011). Why Don't Spiders Stick to Their Webs. Oxford: Oneworld. p. 66. ISBN 978-1-85168-900-2.
  4. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  5. ^ Eck, Werner; translated by Deborah Lucas Schneider; new material by Sarolta A. Takács. (2003) The Age of Augustus. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing (hardcover, ISBN 0-631-22957-4; paperback, ISBN 0-631-22958-2).
  6. ^ a b Georges Declercq, Anno Domini: The origins of the Christian Era (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2000), pp.143–147.
  7. ^ a b G. Declercq, "Dionysius Exiguus and the introduction of the Christian Era", Sacris Erudiri 41 (2002) 165–246, pp.242–246. Annotated version of a portion of Anno Domini.
  8. ^ James D. G. Dunn, Jesus Remembered, Eerdmans Publishing (2003), page 324.
  9. ^ "Adherents.com – Number of Christians in the world". Archived from the original on 2009-08-02. Retrieved 2009-09-10.
  10. ^ Powell, Robert A. (1996). Chronicle of the living Christ : the life and ministry of Jesus Christ : foundations of cosmic Christianity. Hudson, NY: Anthroposophic Press. p. 68. ISBN 9780880104074.
  11. ^ astronomer http://MichaelMolnar.com
  12. ^ Spears, Tom (2005-12-04). "Star of Wonder". Ottawa Citizen. p. A7. "Michael Molnar announced 10 years ago his conclusion that the Star of Bethlehem was in fact a double eclipse of Jupiter in a rare astrological conjunction that occurred in Aries on March 20, 6 BC, and again on April 17, 6 BC. ... Mr. Molnar believes that Roman astrologers would have interpreted the double-eclipse as signifying the birth of a divine king in Judea." However, astronomical software such as Stellarium shows that on March 20, the occultation of Jupiter by the Moon could not be seen from Rome, as the Moon passed by the planet without obscuring it. Furthermore, the event on April 17 began when Jupiter was 38 degrees above the horizon, at 2pm, i.e. in daylight, so it is extremely unlikely that this event would have been seen either.
  13. ^ "When was Jesus Born?". Archived from the original on April 28, 2006. Retrieved June 3, 2006.
  14. ^ Claridge, Amanda (1998). Rome: An Oxford Archaeological Guide. Oxford University Press. pp. 33. ISBN 9780192880031.
  15. ^ "Herod | Biography & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 7 April 2019.