1-Decanol

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1-Decanol[1]
Skeletal formula
Space-filling model
Names
IUPAC name
Decan-1-ol
Other names
decyl alcohol
n-decyl alcohol
capric alcohol
epal 10
antak
agent 504
Identifiers
112-30-1 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:28903 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL25363 YesY
ChemSpider 7882 YesY
Jmol interactive 3D Image
KEGG C01633 YesY
PubChem 8174
UNII 89V4LX791F YesY
Properties
C10H22O
Molar mass 158.28 g/mol
Appearance Viscous liquid
Density 0.8297 g/cm3
Melting point 6.4 °C (43.5 °F; 279.5 K)
Boiling point 232.9 °C (451.2 °F; 506.0 K)
3.7 g/L at 20°C[2]
log P 4.57
Viscosity 12.048 mPa.s (@ 25 °C)
Hazards
Safety data sheet Oxford MSDS
Flash point 108 °C (226 °F; 381 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
YesY verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

1-Decanol is a straight chain fatty alcohol with ten carbon atoms and the molecular formula C10H21OH. It is a colorless to light yellow viscous liquid that is insoluble in water and has an aromatic odor.[3] The interfacial tension against water at 20 °C is 8.97 mN/m.

Production[edit]

Decanol can be prepared by the hydrogenation of decanoic acid, which occurs in modest quantities in coconut oil (about 10%) and palm kernel oil (about 4%). It may also be produced synthetically via the Ziegler process.

Uses[edit]

Decanol is used in the manufacture of plasticizers, lubricants, surfactants and solvents. Its ability to permeate the skin has led to it being investigated as a penetration enhancer for transdermal drug delivery.[4][5]

Safety[edit]

Like other medium chain fatty alcohols, 1-decanol is able to permeate the skin which can lead to irritation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merck Index, 12th Edition, 2911.
  2. ^ http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ipcsneng/neng1490.html
  3. ^ "SAFETY DATA SHEET". Acros Organics. Retrieved 23 April 2015. 
  4. ^ Kanikkannan, N; Singh, Mandip (November 2002). "Skin permeation enhancement effect and skin irritation of saturated fatty alcohols". International Journal of Pharmaceutics 248 (1-2): 219–228. doi:10.1016/S0378-5173(02)00454-4. 
  5. ^ Williams, Adrian C; Barry, Brian W (March 2004). "Penetration enhancers". Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews 56 (5): 603–618. doi:10.1016/j.addr.2003.10.025.