1-Phenylethylamine

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1-Phenylethylamine[1]
Chemical structure of 1-Phenylethylamine
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
1-Phenylethan-1-amine
Other names
(±)-1-Phenylethylamine
(±)-α-Methylbenzylamine
Identifiers
618-36-0 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:670 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL278059 YesY
ChemSpider 7130 YesY
Jmol 3D model Interactive image
Interactive image
KEGG C02455 YesY
Properties
C8H11N
Molar mass 121.18 g·mol−1
Density 0.94 g/mL
Melting point -65 C[citation needed] 
Boiling point 187 °C (369 °F; 460 K)
Hazards
Main hazards Corrosive
Related compounds
Related stereoisomers
(R)-(+)- (CAS [3886-69-9])
(S)-(–)- (CAS [2627-86-3])
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

1-Phenylethylamine is the organic compound with the formula C6H5CH(NH2)CH3. Classified as a monoamine, this colorless liquid is often used in chiral resolutions. Like benzylamine, it is highly basic and forms stable ammonium salts and imines.

This compound may be prepared by the reductive amination of acetophenone under various standard conditions for this type of reaction. One major route for this chemical uses the Mignonac reaction, a one-pot protocol using hydrogen gas as the reducing agent:[2]

Reductive amination acetophenone ammonia

The Leuckart reaction, using ammonium formate, is another method for this transformation.[3][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1-Phenylethylamine - PubChem Public Chemical Database
  2. ^ John C. Robinson, Jr. and H. R. Snyder (1955). "α-Phenylethylamine". Org. Synth. ; Coll. Vol., 3, p. 717 
  3. ^ Mann, F. G.; Saunders, B. C. (1960). Practical Organic Chemistry, 4th Ed. London: Longman. pp. 223–224. ISBN 9780582444072. 
  4. ^ A. W. Ingersoll (1937). "α-Phenylethylamine". Org. Synth. ; Coll. Vol., 17, p. 76