1.1.1.1

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1.1.1.1 is a free Domain Name System (DNS) service. The public DNS service and servers are maintained and owned by Cloudflare in partnership with APNIC.[1] The service functions as a recursive name server providing domain name resolution for any host on the Internet. The service was announced on April 1, 2018,[2] and is claimed by Cloudflare to be "the Internet's fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service".[3] On November 11, 2018, Cloudflare announced a mobile version of their 1.1.1.1 service for iOS and Android.[4]

Service[edit]

The 1.1.1.1 DNS service operates recursive name servers for public use at the four following IP addresses:[5]

IPv4 1.1.1.1

1.0.0.1

IPv6 2606:4700:4700::1111

2606:4700:4700::1001

The addresses are mapped to the nearest operational server by anycast routing.[6] The DNS service is also available for Tor clients.[7]

Criticism and problems[edit]

Technology websites noted that by using 1.1.1.1 as the IP address for its service, Cloudflare exposed misconfigurations in existing setups that violated internet standards (such as RFC1918). 1.1.1.1 was not a reserved IP address, and was abused by many existing routers (mostly those sold by Cisco Systems) and companies for hosting login pages to private networks, exit pages or other purposes, rendering the proper routing of 1.1.1.1 impossible on those systems.[8][9] Additionally, 1.1.1.1 is blocked on many networks and by multiple ISPs because the simplicity of the address means that it was previously often used inappropriately for testing purposes and not legitimate use.[8] These previous uses have led to a huge influx of garbage data to Cloudflare's servers.[9]

Cleanup of 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1[edit]

The 1.0.0.0/8 IP block was assigned in 2010 to APNIC;[10] before this time it was unassigned space.[11] An unassigned IP space, however is not the same as a reserved IP space for private use (called a reserved IP address).[12] For example, AT&T has said it is working on fixing this issue[13] within its CPE hardware.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ APNIC Labs enters into a research agreement with Cloudflare, Geoff Huston, APNIC Blog, 2 Apr 2018
  2. ^ Cloudflare launches 1.1.1.1 DNS service that will speed up your internet The Verge, 1 April 2018
  3. ^ Announcing 1.1.1.1: the fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service, Official Cloudflare Blog
  4. ^ Cimpanu, Catalin. "Cloudflare launches Android and iOS apps for its 1.1.1.1 service | ZDNet". ZDNet.
  5. ^ Setting Up 1.1.1.1 Speed
  6. ^ Introducing DNS Resolver, 1.1.1.1 (not a joke) DNS resolver, 1.1.1.1, is served by Cloudflare’s Global Anycast Network.
  7. ^ "Introducing DNS Resolver for Tor". Cloudflare. 5 June 2018. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  8. ^ a b Cherry, Denny (2018-04-05). "5 reasons Cloudflare's roll-out of 1.1.1.1 has been a disaster". Tech Target. Retrieved 2018-04-26.
  9. ^ a b "1.1.1.1: Cloudflare's new DNS attracting 'gigabits per second' of rubbish". ZDNet. 2018-04-04. Retrieved 2018-04-26.
  10. ^ "1/8 and 27/8 allocated to APNIC". NANOG. 2010-01-21. Retrieved 2018-05-03.
  11. ^ List of assigned /8 IPv4 address blocks
  12. ^ Fixing reachability to 1.1.1.1, GLOBALLY!, by Marty Strong, 10 Apr 2018
  13. ^ Tweet by @billplein, 3 April 2018

External links[edit]