1000s (decade)

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The 1000s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1000, and ended on December 31, 1009.

Events[edit]

1000

This section is transcluded from 1000. (edit | history)

Christendom[edit]

Main article: Europe in AD 1000
Europe in 1000

In continental Europe, the Holy Roman Empire established itself as the most powerful state. Otto III made a pilgrimage from Rome to Aachen and Gniezno (Gnesen), stopping at Regensburg, Meissen, Magdeburg, and Gniezno. The Congress of Gniezno (with Bolesław I Chrobry) was part of his pilgrimage. In Rome, he built the basilica of San Bartolomeo all'Isola, to host the relics of St. Bartholomew.

In France, Robert II, the son of Hugh Capet, was the first of the Capetian kings.

The Byzantine Empire under the Macedonian dynasty was engaged in a long and hard war with the First Bulgarian Empire. In the year 1000, the Byzantine generals Theodorokanos and Nikephoros Xiphias captured the former Bulgarian capitals of Pliska and Great Preslav, along with Little Preslav, extending Byzantine control over the northeastern portion of the Bulgarian state (Mysia and Scythia Minor). At the same time, Byzantium was instrumental in the Christianization of the Kievan Rus' and of other medieval Slavic states.

In Great Britain, a unified kingdom of England had developed out of the various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. In Scandinavia, Christianization was in its early stages, with the Althingi of the Icelandic Commonwealth embracing Christianity in the year 1000.

On September 9, King Olaf Tryggvason was defeated by an alliance of his enemies in the Battle of Svolder. Sweyn I established Danish control over part of Norway. Oslo, Norway, was founded (the exact year is debatable, but the 1,000 year anniversary was held in the year 2000).

The Papacy during this time was in a period of decline, in retrospect known as the saeculum obscurum ("Dark Age") or "pornocracy" ("rule of harlots"), a state of affairs that would result in the Great Schism later in the 11th century.

Hungary was established in 1000 as a Christian state. In the next centuries, the Kingdom of Hungary became the pre-eminent cultural power in the Central European region. On December 25, Stephen I was crowned as the first King of Hungary in Esztergom.

Sancho III of Navarre became King of Aragon and Navarre. The Reconquista was gaining some ground, but the southern Iberian peninsula would still be dominated by Islam for centuries to come; Córdoba at this time was the world's largest city with 450,000 inhabitants.

It is believed that in or around this year, Norse explorer Leif Ericson became the first European to land in the Americas, at L'Anse aux Meadows in modern-day Newfoundland.

Muslim world[edit]

The Islamic World was in its Golden Age; still organised in Caliphates, it was still dominated by the Abbasid Caliphate, with the Caliphate of Córdoba to the west, and ongoing campaigns in Africa and in India. Persia was a period of instability, with various polities seceding from Abassid rule, among whom the Ghaznavids would emerge as the most powerful.

The Islamic world was reaching the peak of its historical scientific achievements. Important scholars and scientists who flourished in the year 1000 include Abu al-Qasim (Abulcasis), Ibn Yunus (publishes his astronomical treatise Al-Zij al-Hakimi al-Kabir in Cairo in c. 1000), Abu Sahl al-Quhi (Kuhi), Abu-Mahmud al-Khujandi, Abu Nasr Mansur, Abu al-Wafa, Ahmad ibn Fadlan, Al-Muqaddasi, Ali Ibn Isa, and al-Karaji (al-Karkhi). Ibn al-Haytham (Book of Optics), Avicenna, Abu Rayhan al-Biruni, and Abu al-Qasim (Al-Tasrif), who all flourished around the year 1000, are considered to be among the greatest scientists of the Middle Ages altogether.[citation needed]

The Turkic migration by this time had reached Eastern Europe, and most of the Turkic tribes (Khazars, Bulghars, Pechenegs etc.) had been Islamized.

1001

This section is transcluded from 1001. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]
North America[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


1002

This section is transcluded from 1002. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]
Sub-Saharan Africa[edit]


1003

This section is transcluded from 1003. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

America[edit]
Eastern Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]
Middle East[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]
Religion[edit]


1004

This section is transcluded from 1004. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]


1005

This section is transcluded from 1005. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Eastern Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]


1006

This section is transcluded from 1006. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
  • Granaries for famine relief are set up across China.
Europe[edit]
Oceania[edit]
  • A major eruption of the Mount Merapi volcano covers all of central Java with volcanic ash, causes devastation throughout central Java, and destroys a Hindu kingdom on the island of Java.[7]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
Astronomy[edit]
  • May 1 – The brightest supernova ever recorded, SN 1006, occurs in the constellation of Lupus. It is observed and described in China, Japan, the Middle East, Europe, and elsewhere. The records of the event are suppressed in some western countries.[citation needed] The Supernova provides enough light to read by on a night with a dark moon.


1007

This section is transcluded from 1007. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
  • Songjiang County (later the city of Shanghai) is founded (approximate date).
  • Snow falls in the city of Baghdad.
Europe[edit]
  • Aethelred buys two years of peace with the Danes, for 36,000 pounds of silver.
  • One of Mt. Vesuvius's many eruptions occurs.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


1008

This section is transcluded from 1008. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


1009

This section is transcluded from 1009. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Science and technology[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Khotyn". Antychnyi Kyiv (in Russian). Archived from the original on May 13, 2007. Retrieved 2007-05-28. 
  2. ^ a b Boissonade, B. "Les premières croisades françaises en Espagne. Normands, Gascons, Aquitains et Bourguignons (1018-1032)". Bulletin Hispanique. 36 (1): 5–28. doi:10.3406/hispa.1934.2607. 
  3. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010) L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; pp.47.
  4. ^ Moody, TW; Martin, FX, eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press. p. 113. 
  5. ^ Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 47–48. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  6. ^ Benvenuti, Gino (1985). Le Repubbliche Marinare. Amalfi, Pisa, Genova e Venezia. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. p. 41. ISBN 88-8289-529-7. 
  7. ^ "A history of Merapi". Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  8. ^ In the Annals of Quedlinburg, Saxony-Anhalt.
  9. ^ Sutton, Ian (1999). Architecture, from Ancient Greece to the Present. London: Thames & Hudson. ISBN 978-0-500-20316-3.