1020s

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The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

Events

1020

By place[edit]

1021

By place[edit]

Japan[edit]

Daughter of Michinaga, Fujiwara no Kishi is married to Crown Prince Atsunaga (to be next empress)

Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]

1022

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
  • Spring – Emperor Henry II divides his army into three columns and descends through Rome onto Capua. The bulk of the expeditionary force (20,000 men) led by Henry, makes its way down the Adriatic coast.
  • Pilgrim, archbishop of Cologne, marches with his army down the Tyrrhenian coast to lay siege to Capua. The citizens open the gates and surrender the city to the imperial army.[3]
  • Pilgrim besieges the city of Salerno for forty days. Prince Guaimar III offers to give hostages – Pilgrim accepts the prince's son and co-prince Guaimar IV, and lifts the siege.[4]
  • Summer – Outbreak of the plague among the German troops forces Henry II to abandon his campaign in Italy. He reimposes his suzerainty on the Lombard principalities.
  • King Olof Skötkonung dies and is succeeded by his son Anund Jakob (or James) as ruler of Sweden. He becomes the second Christian king of the Swedish realm.
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • The Chinese military has one million registered soldiers during the Song Dynasty, an increase since the turn of the 11th century (approximate date).

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

1023

By place[edit]

Japan =[edit]

60th Birthday and Longevity Ceremony of Minamoto no Rinshi (Female head of the Fujiwara clan, Wife of Fujiwara no Michinaga, mother of Grand Empress Dowager Shoshi, Empress Dowager Kenshi and Empress Ishi, grandmother of Emperor Go-Ichijo)

April: An epidemic in Kyoto was so severe that there were corpses in the streets;[5] disease spread throughout the country

Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

1024

By place[edit]

Japan[edit]

Daini no Sanmi (waka poet, lady-in-waiting to Grand Empress Dowager Shoshi) is married to Kanetaka

Sagami (waka poet) divorce and return to Kyoto - she become a lady-in-waiting to Imperial Princess Shushi

Murder of the daughter of late Emperor Kazan - the girl was a lady-in-waiting to Grand Empress Dowager Shoshi who order the investigation

13 May: Daughter of Michinaga, Fujiwara no Takako is married to Minamoto no Morofusa

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

1025

By place[edit]

Japan[edit]

- Regent Yorimichi holds horse racing in his mansion (the emperor attends, too)

21 January: Daughter of Fujiwara no Sanesuke (rival of Michinaga), Chifuru has her Mogi Ceremony - Sanesuke want to make his daughter to imperial consort which cause the dislike of Empress Ishi (daughter of Michinaga) - eventually Regent Yorimichi prevent them

11 August: Death of Princess Consort Kanshi (daughter of Michinaga, half-sister of Grand Empress Dowager Shoshi and Empress Ishi)

28 August: Crown Princess Kishi (daughter of Michinaga) give birth to Prince Chikahito - it is a great joy but Kishi die only a few days later so she never will be empress

November: Death of Koshikibu no Naishi (daughter of Izumi Shikibu, lady-in-waiting to Grand Empress Dowager Shoshi, lover of Minister Norimichi)

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]

1026

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • A Zubu revolt against the Liao dynasty is suppressed, with the Zubu forced to pay an annual tribute of horses, camels and furs.

1027

By place[edit]

Japan[edit]

Wedding of Crown Prince Atsunaga and Imperial Princess Teishi (the wife of the crown prince died in 1025 from childbirth)

19 January: Empress Ishi give birth to Imperial Princess Shoshi

16 October: Death of Empress Dowager Kenshi - Izumi Shikibu writes a poem for her memory

Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Science, technology and medicine[edit]

1028

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
England[edit]
Europe[edit]

1029

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

1020

1021

1022

1023

1024

1025

1026

1027

1028

1029

Deaths[edit]

1020

1021

1022

1023

1024

1025

1026

1027

1028

1029

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bresc, Henri (2003). "La Sicile et l'espace libyen au Moyen Age" (PDF). Parte prima. Il regno normanno e il Mediterraneo. Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  2. ^ Hewsen, Robert H. (2001). Armenia: A Historical Atlas. The University of Chicago Press. p. 126. ISBN 0-226-33228-4.
  3. ^ Norwich, John Julius (1967). The Normans in the South. London: Longman, pp. 26–28.
  4. ^ Amatus, Dunbar & Loud (2004), p. 53. The young prince was sent to the papal court for safekeeping according to Amatus.
  5. ^ Walker, Williston (1921). A History of the Christian Church. Charles Scribner's Sons, p. 218.
  6. ^ Ortenberg. Anglo-Saxon Church and the Papacy. English Church and the Papacy, p. 49.
  7. ^ Wortley, John, ed. (2010). John Skylitzes: A Synopsis of Byzantine History, 811–1057. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 347. ISBN 978-0-521-76705-7.
  8. ^ Boissonade, B. "Les premières croisades françaises en Espagne. Normands, Gascons, Aquitains et Bourguignons (1018-1032)". Bulletin Hispanique. 36 (1): 5–28. doi:10.3406/hispa.1934.2607.
  9. ^ Meynier, Gilbert (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte. p.50.
  10. ^ Jonathan Riley-Smith (2004). The New Cambridge Medieval History. Volume IV c.1024–c.1198. p. 72. ISBN 978-0-521-41411-1.
  11. ^ Josis–Roland, Françoise (1970). "La basilique Notre-Dame de Walcourt" [The basilica of Our Lady in Walcourt] (PDF). Bulletin de la Commission Royale des Monuments et des Sites (in French): 65. Retrieved 20 June 2021.
  12. ^ Lucy Margaret Smith (1920). The Early History of the Monastery of Cluny. Oxford University Press.
  13. ^ Dated 1025 by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which gives the victory to Sweden.
  14. ^ Wolfram, Herwig (2006). Conrad II, 990-1039: Emperor of Three Kingdoms. Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 102. ISBN 0-271-02738-X.
  15. ^ Clark, William W. (2006). Medieval Cathedrals. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 978-0-313-32693-6.
  16. ^ Goodman, Lenn Evan (1992). Avicenna. London: Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 0-415-01929-X.