1039

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1039 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1039
MXXXIX
Ab urbe condita1792
Armenian calendar488
ԹՎ ՆՁԸ
Assyrian calendar5789
Balinese saka calendar960–961
Bengali calendar446
Berber calendar1989
English Regnal yearN/A
Buddhist calendar1583
Burmese calendar401
Byzantine calendar6547–6548
Chinese calendar戊寅(Earth Tiger)
3735 or 3675
    — to —
己卯年 (Earth Rabbit)
3736 or 3676
Coptic calendar755–756
Discordian calendar2205
Ethiopian calendar1031–1032
Hebrew calendar4799–4800
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1095–1096
 - Shaka Samvat960–961
 - Kali Yuga4139–4140
Holocene calendar11039
Igbo calendar39–40
Iranian calendar417–418
Islamic calendar430–431
Japanese calendarChōryaku 3
(長暦3年)
Javanese calendar942–943
Julian calendar1039
MXXXIX
Korean calendar3372
Minguo calendar873 before ROC
民前873年
Nanakshahi calendar−429
Seleucid era1350/1351 AG
Thai solar calendar1581–1582
Tibetan calendar阳土虎年
(male Earth-Tiger)
1165 or 784 or 12
    — to —
阴土兔年
(female Earth-Rabbit)
1166 or 785 or 13
Casimir I (the Restorer) (1016–1058)

Year 1039 (MXXXIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • June 4 – Emperor Conrad II (the Elder) dies of gout in Utrecht after a 12-year reign. He is succeeded by his 21-year-old son, Henry III (the Black), who becomes also king of Italy and Burgundy.
  • Duke Casimir I (the Restorer) returns to Poland, and makes great efforts to rebuild the war-ruined country. He establishes his residence at Kraków (which becomes Poland's capital until 1596).[1]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Brzezinski (1995). History of Poland: Old Poland – The Piast Dynasty, p. 18. ISBN 83-7212-019-6.
  2. ^ Constable, Giles (2008). Three Treatises From Bec on the Nature of Monastic Life. University of Toronto Press. p. 28. ISBN 9781442691629.
  3. ^ "Conrad II - Holy Roman emperor". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  4. ^ McGrath, Alister E. (2013). Christian History: An Introduction. John Wiley & Sons. p. 104. ISBN 9781118337790.