10th Frame

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10th Frame
10th frame Cover.jpg
Cover art
Developer(s) Access Software
Publisher(s) U.S. Gold
Platform(s) Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, DOS, MSX, ZX Spectrum
Release
Genre(s) Sports
Mode(s) Single-player

10th Frame is a ten-pin bowling simulation game created by Access Software in 1986, as a follow-up to the hugely successful Leaderboard golf game. Up to eight players could take part in open bowling or a tournament. There was a choice of 3 different difficulty levels—Kids (in which the ball always went straight), Amateur, and Professional.

Gameplay[edit]

The lane was viewed from behind the bowler, with the pins towards the top of the screen in a 3D perspective.[1]

The scorecard for the current player was displayed above the lane. The player could move left or right on the lane before starting the run-up by holding fire. A target cursor could also be moved by pushing up and then moving it left or right (pressing down returned control to moving the onscreen player's position).[1]

Once the fire button was held, a power meter similar to Leaderboard's was employed. The speed of the shot was determined by how long the button was held down. A small zone at the top determined if the player made an error, exaggerating any spin.[1]

When the meter started to descend on the right, it was stopped in the hook zone to determine how much hook/spin was applied—from straight at the top of the zone to full hook at the bottom. Play was completed after the usual ten frames and any bonus balls.[1]

The animation used a similar sprite system to Leaderboard, and the falling pin physics were handled well.[1]

Players could print out a scorecard at the end of a match.

Ports[edit]

The game was released on various home computers such as ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, and Commodore 64. It was also released for the Atari ST and MSX. A Nintendo Entertainment System version was planned, but was eventually cancelled.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Review scores
Publication Score
C&VG 9/10[2]
ZZAP!64 85%[1]
Your Sinclair 7/10[3]
  • C&VG reviewed the Commodore 64 version in issue 65 and called it a Game of the Month with a 9/10 score.
  • ZZAP!64 awarded the game 85% in issue 22, calling it "another slick and extremely well programmed Access sport simulation".[1]
  • Your Sinclair gave the ZX Spectrum conversion 7 out of 10, stating that "10th Frame requires a lot of skill and is a pretty good simulation".[3]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Test: Tenth Frame". ZZap! 64. Issue 22. February 1987. p. 130. Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  2. ^ "C+VG Reviews: 10th Frame". Computer and Video Games Magazine. Issue 65. March 1987. pp. 14–15. Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Robson, Rick (April 1987). "10th Frame". Your Sinclair. Issue 16. Retrieved February 21, 2016.