1105

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1105 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1105
MCV
Ab urbe condita1858
Armenian calendar554
ԹՎ ՇԾԴ
Assyrian calendar5855
Balinese saka calendar1026–1027
Bengali calendar512
Berber calendar2055
English Regnal yearHen. 1 – 6 Hen. 1
Buddhist calendar1649
Burmese calendar467
Byzantine calendar6613–6614
Chinese calendar甲申(Wood Monkey)
3801 or 3741
    — to —
乙酉年 (Wood Rooster)
3802 or 3742
Coptic calendar821–822
Discordian calendar2271
Ethiopian calendar1097–1098
Hebrew calendar4865–4866
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1161–1162
 - Shaka Samvat1026–1027
 - Kali Yuga4205–4206
Holocene calendar11105
Igbo calendar105–106
Iranian calendar483–484
Islamic calendar498–499
Japanese calendarChōji 2
(長治2年)
Javanese calendar1010–1011
Julian calendar1105
MCV
Korean calendar3438
Minguo calendar807 before ROC
民前807年
Nanakshahi calendar−363
Seleucid era1416/1417 AG
Thai solar calendar1647–1648
Tibetan calendar阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1231 or 850 or 78
    — to —
阴木鸡年
(female Wood-Rooster)
1232 or 851 or 79
Baldwin I defeats the Fatimids (1105).

Year 1105 (MCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Levant[edit]

Europe[edit]

England[edit]

  • Summer – King Henry I invades Normandy, takes Bayeux (after a short siege) and Caen. He advances on Falaise, and starts inconclusive peace negotiations with Duke Robert II (Curthose). Henry withdraws to deal with political issues at home.
  • Henry I meets Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, under threat of excommunication at L'Aigle in Normandy to settle their disputes that has led to Anselm's exile from England (see 1103).

Seljuk Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 49. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  2. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 72–73. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  3. ^ Picard C. (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident au Moyen Age. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  4. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 39. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  5. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 87. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.