110 (number)

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← 109 110 111 →
Cardinalone hundred ten
Ordinal110th
(one hundred tenth)
Factorization2 × 5 × 11
Divisors1, 2, 5, 10, 11, 22, 55, 110
Greek numeralΡΙ´
Roman numeralCX
Binary11011102
Ternary110023
Octal1568
Duodecimal9212
Hexadecimal6E16

110 (one hundred and ten) is the natural number following 109 and preceding 111.

In mathematics[edit]

110 is a sphenic number and a pronic number.[1] Following the prime quadruplet (101, 103, 107, 109), at 110, the Mertens function reaches a low of −5.

110 is the sum of three consecutive squares, .

RSA-110 is one of the RSA numbers, large semiprimes that are part of the RSA Factoring Challenge.

In base 10, the number 110 is a Harshad number[2] and a self number.[3]

In science[edit]

In religion[edit]

In sports[edit]

Olympic male track and field athletics run 110 metre hurdles. (Female athletes run the 100 metre hurdles instead.)

The International 110, or the 110, is a one-design racing sailboat designed in 1939 by C. Raymond Hunt.

In other fields[edit]

110 is also:

  • The year AD 110 or 110 BC
  • A common name for mains electricity in North America, despite the nominal voltage actually being 120 V (range 110–120 V). Normally spoken as "one-ten".
  • 1-1-0, the emergency telephone number used to reach police services in Iran, Germany, Estonia, China, Indonesia, and Japan. Also used to reach the fire and rescue services in Norway and Turkey.
  • The age a person must attain in order to be considered a supercentenarian.
  • A card game related to Forty-five (card game).
  • A percentage in the expression "To give 110%", meaning to give a little more effort than one's maximum effort
  • The number of stories of each of the towers of the former World Trade Center in New York.
  • The number of stories (by common reckoning) of the Sears Tower in Chicago.
  • The TCP port used for POP3 email protocol
  • A 110 block is a type of punch block used to connect sets of wires in a structured cabling system.
  • The abjad (ابجد) translation of word "علی" (Ali) in Arabic and Persian.
  • It is also known as "eleventy", a term made famous by linguist and author J. R. R. Tolkien (Bilbo Baggins celebrates his eleventy-first birthday at the beginning of The Lord of the Rings) and derived from the Old English hund endleofantig.[8] When the word eleventy is used, it may indicate the exact number (110), or more commonly an indefinite large number such as gazillion.
  • Eleventy is used in the comic reading of a phone number in the Irish TV series "The Savage Eye" by Dave McSavage playing an opiate user advertising life insurance.
  • Lowest number to not be considered a favorite by anyone among 44,000 people surveyed in a 2014 online poll[9] and subsequently adopted by British television show QI as the show's favourite number in 2017.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sloane's A002378 : Oblong (or promic, pronic, or heteromecic) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  2. ^ "Sloane's A005349 : Niven (or Harshad) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  3. ^ "Sloane's A003052 : Self numbers or Colombian numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  4. ^ Genesis 50:22
  5. ^ Genesis 50:26
  6. ^ Joshua 24:29
  7. ^ Judges 2:8
  8. ^ Etymology at www.etymoline.com
  9. ^ Bellos, Alex (2014-04-08). "'Seven' triumphs in poll to discover world's favourite number". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-02-08.