1115 Sabauda

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1115 Sabauda
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Volta
Discovery site Pino Torinese Obs.
Discovery date 13 December 1928
Designations
MPC designation (1115) Sabauda
Named after
House of Savoy
(rulers of Italy)[2]
1928 XC · A906 YF
main-belt · (outer)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 88.47 yr (32,314 days)
Aphelion 3.6333 AU
Perihelion 2.5750 AU
3.1041 AU
Eccentricity 0.1705
5.47 yr (1,998 days)
58.449°
0° 10m 48.72s / day
Inclination 15.271°
71.679°
57.292°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 75.907±0.656[3]
6.75 h (0.281 d)
0.044±0.006[3]
0.0711±0.004
9.7[1]

1115 Sabauda is a dark asteroid from the main-belt, about 69 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Luigi Volta on December 13, 1928, at Pino Torinese in Turin, Italy. It was independently discovered five days later by Josep Comas Solá at the Fabra Observatory in Barcelona, Spain. Its provisional designation was 1928 XC.

Orbit and classification[edit]

Sabauda orbits the Sun in the outer main-belt at a distance of 2.6–3.6 AU once every 5 years and 6 months (1,998 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.17 and an inclination of 15° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Photometric observations of this asteroid collected during 2006 show a rotation period of 6.72 ± 0.01 hours with a brightness variation of 0.27 ± 0.02 magnitude.[4] It has a low geometric albedo of 0.044.[1]

Naming[edit]

The asteroid bears the Latin name of the former rulers of Italy, the House of Savoy (Sabauda, or Sapauda). It is also possible that it was named after the new established town of Sabauda in the Pontine Marshes, central Italy.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1115 Sabauda (1928 XC)" (2017-07-02 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1115) Sabauda. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 95. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 17 August 2017. 
  4. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2006), "Asteroid lightcurve analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - March - June 2006", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 33 (4): 85–88, Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...85W. 

External links[edit]