1118

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1118 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1118
MCXVIII
Ab urbe condita1871
Armenian calendar567
ԹՎ ՇԿԷ
Assyrian calendar5868
Balinese saka calendar1039–1040
Bengali calendar525
Berber calendar2068
English Regnal year18 Hen. 1 – 19 Hen. 1
Buddhist calendar1662
Burmese calendar480
Byzantine calendar6626–6627
Chinese calendar丁酉(Fire Rooster)
3814 or 3754
    — to —
戊戌年 (Earth Dog)
3815 or 3755
Coptic calendar834–835
Discordian calendar2284
Ethiopian calendar1110–1111
Hebrew calendar4878–4879
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1174–1175
 - Shaka Samvat1039–1040
 - Kali Yuga4218–4219
Holocene calendar11118
Igbo calendar118–119
Iranian calendar496–497
Islamic calendar511–512
Japanese calendarEikyū 6 / Gen'ei 1
(元永元年)
Javanese calendar1023–1024
Julian calendar1118
MCXVIII
Korean calendar3451
Minguo calendar794 before ROC
民前794年
Nanakshahi calendar−350
Seleucid era1429/1430 AG
Thai solar calendar1660–1661
Tibetan calendar阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1244 or 863 or 91
    — to —
阳土狗年
(male Earth-Dog)
1245 or 864 or 92

Year 1118 (MCXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • Peace between England and Flanders is agreed upon.[1]
British isles[edit]
Byzantine Empire[edit]
Eastern Europe[edit]
France[edit]
Germany[edit]
Italy[edit]
Scandinavia[edit]
Spain[edit]

Asia[edit]

East Asia[edit]
Caucasus[edit]
Western Asia[edit]
South Asia[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Pope Paschal II d. January 21, 1118
Baldwin I of Jerusalem d. April 2, 1118
Alexius I Komnenos d. August 15, 1118

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 59–60. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  2. ^ "Peterborough Cathedral website". Retrieved 2007-12-19.
  3. ^ The Letters of Abelard and Heloise (Revised ed.). London: Penguin. 2003. p. x. ISBN 978-0-140-44899-3.
  4. ^ Stalls, Clay (1995). Possessing the land: Aragon's expansion into Islam's Ebro frontier under Alfonso the Battler, 1104-1134. Brill. p. viii. ISBN 90-04-10367-8.
  5. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010) L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; pp.86.
  6. ^ McGrank, Lawrence (1981). "Norman crusaders and the Catalan reconquest: Robert Burdet and te principality of Tarragona 1129-55". Journal of Medieval History. 7 (1): 67–82. doi:10.1016/0304-4181(81)90036-1.