1139 Atami

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1139 Atami
Discovery [1]
Discovered by O. Oikawa
K. Kubokawa
Discovery site Tokyo Astronomical Obs. (389)
Discovery date 1 December 1929
Designations
MPC designation 1139 Atami
Named after
Atami (Japanese city)[2]
1929 XE
Mars-crosser[1][3][4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 87.10 yr (31,814 days)
Aphelion 2.4447 AU
Perihelion 1.4502 AU
1.9474 AU
Eccentricity 0.2553
2.72 yr (993 days)
38.329°
0° 21m 45.72s / day
Inclination 13.086°
213.35°
206.57°
Known satellites 1 [5]
Earth MOID 0.4720 AU · 183.8 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 9.35 km (calculated)[4]
15 h[6]
20 h[7]
24 h[8]
27.446±0.001 h[8]
27.45±0.01 h[8]
27.45±0.05 h[8]
27.472±0.002 h[8]
27.56±0.01 h[9]
0.20 (assumed)[4]
B–V = 0.920[1]
U–B = 0.497[1]
S (Tholen) · S (SMASS)
S[4][10]
12.51[1][4] · 12.59±0.37[10] · 12.86±0.02[6]

1139 Atami, provisional designation 1929 XE, is a binary[5] asteroid and Mars-crosser, approximately 9 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 1 December 1929, by Japanese astronomers Okuro Oikawa and Kazuo Kubokawa at the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory (389) near Tokyo.[3]

The stony S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.5–2.4 AU once every 2 years and 9 months (993 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.26 and an inclination of 13° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

In 2005, two rotational light-curves obtained at the U.S. Antelope Hills Observatory in New Mexico and by a collaboration of several European astronomers gave a rotation period of 27.56±0.01 and 27.446±0.001 hours with a brightness variation of 0.45 and 0.40 in magnitude, respectively (U=3/3).[8][9]

The minor planet was named after Atami, a Japanese city and harbor near Tokyo, Japan.[2] Naming citation was first mentioned in The Names of the Minor Planets by Paul Herget in 1955 (H 106).[2]

Binary system[edit]

Photometric and Arecibo echo spectra observations in 2005 confirmed a 5 kilometer satellite orbiting at least 15 kilometers from its primary.[5] Due to the similar size of the primary and secondary the Minor Planet Center lists this as a binary companion.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1139 Atami (1929 XE)" (2017-01-07 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1139) Atami. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 96. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  3. ^ a b "1139 Atami (1929 XE)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (1139) Atami". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c "Electronic Telegram No. 430". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. 2006-03-14. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  6. ^ a b Wisniewski, W. Z.; Michalowski, T. M.; Harris, A. W.; McMillan, R. S. (March 1995). "Photoelectric Observations of 125 Asteroids". Abstracts of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Bibcode:1995LPI....26.1511W. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  7. ^ Lupishko, D. F.; Velichko, F. P.; Shevchenko, V. G. (June 1988). "Photometry of the AMOR type asteroids 1036 Ganymede and 1139 Atami". Astronomicheskii Vestnik: 167–173.InRussian. Bibcode:1988AVest..22..167L. ISSN 0320-930X. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1139) Atami". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Koff, Robert A. (June 2006). "Lightcurves of asteroids 141 Lumen, 259 Alatheia, 363 Padua, 455 Bruchsalia 514 Armida, 524 Fidelio, and 1139 Atami". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (2): 31–33. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...31K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  11. ^ "Satellites and Companions of Minor Planets". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. 2009-09-17. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 

External links[edit]