1142 Aetolia

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1142 Aetolia
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 24 January 1930
Designations
MPC designation (1142) Aetolia
Named after
Aetolia (Greek region)[2]
1930 BC · 1931 LC
1937 LN · 1937 LU
1942 GF · 1942 GS
1943 PF · 1948 JS
1948 KG · 1954 KJ
1954 MU · 1958 BB
A902 GB · A907 CB
A908 GB
main-belt · (outer)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 115.24 yr (42,093 days)
Aphelion 3.4423 AU
Perihelion 2.9265 AU
3.1844 AU
Eccentricity 0.0810
5.68 yr (2,076 days)
90.209°
0° 10m 24.24s / day
Inclination 2.1096°
139.34°
96.492°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 22.135±0.133[3]
10.730 h (0.4471 d)
0.273±0.034[3]
10.2[1]

1142 Aetolia, provisional designation 1930 BC, is an asteroid on the main belt, which was discovered by Karl Reinmuth on January 24, 1930, at Heidelberg Observatory, Germany. It orbits once every 5.68 years.[1]

It is named after the Greek region Aetolia, north of the Gulf of Patras.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1142 Aetolia (1930 BC)" (2017-07-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1142) Aetolia. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 97. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 17 August 2017. 

External links[edit]