1169

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1169 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1169
MCLXIX
Ab urbe condita1922
Armenian calendar618
ԹՎ ՈԺԸ
Assyrian calendar5919
Balinese saka calendar1090–1091
Bengali calendar576
Berber calendar2119
English Regnal year15 Hen. 2 – 16 Hen. 2
Buddhist calendar1713
Burmese calendar531
Byzantine calendar6677–6678
Chinese calendar戊子年 (Earth Rat)
3865 or 3805
    — to —
己丑年 (Earth Ox)
3866 or 3806
Coptic calendar885–886
Discordian calendar2335
Ethiopian calendar1161–1162
Hebrew calendar4929–4930
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1225–1226
 - Shaka Samvat1090–1091
 - Kali Yuga4269–4270
Holocene calendar11169
Igbo calendar169–170
Iranian calendar547–548
Islamic calendar564–565
Japanese calendarNin'an 4 / Kaō 1
(嘉応元年)
Javanese calendar1076–1077
Julian calendar1169
MCLXIX
Korean calendar3502
Minguo calendar743 before ROC
民前743年
Nanakshahi calendar−299
Seleucid era1480/1481 AG
Thai solar calendar1711–1712
Tibetan calendar阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
1295 or 914 or 142
    — to —
阴土牛年
(female Earth-Ox)
1296 or 915 or 143
Lady Rosamund Clifford (the Fair)

Year 1169 (MCLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

  • Late Summer – Emperor Manuel I (Komnenos) sends an embassy to Egypt to demand tribute, and threatens the country with war when they refuse to pay it. The Byzantine fleet under Admiral Andronikos Kontostephanos sets out from the Hellespont; 60 war galleys are sent to Palestine. with money for "the knights of Jerusalem". Andronikos with the rest of the fleet sails to Cyprus, at which he defeats a patrolling squadron of 6 Fatimid ships.[1]

Europe[edit]

England[edit]

Ireland[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • Spring – A Zangid expedition under General Shirkuh accompanied by his nephew Saladin invades Egypt. King Amalric I of Jerusalem orders his fleet to return to Acre and retreats with the Crusaders back to Palestine.
  • January 8 – Shirkuh enters Cairo, leaving the Zangid army encamped outside the city. He goes to the palace, where the 18-year-old Fatimid caliph Al-Adid welcomes him with ceremonial gifts and promised money.[5]
  • January 18Shawar, Fatimid vizier and de facto ruler, is invited to join Shirkuh on a pilgrimage to the tomb of Al-Shafi'i. Underway he and his escort are taken prisoner; on orders from Al-Adid, Shawar is decapitated.[6]
  • March 23 – Shirkuh dies from over-eating after a 2-month reign.[7] He is succeeded by Saladin, who is appointed chief vizier of the Fatimid Caliphate. He takes over as commander of Nur al-Din's forces in Egypt.[8]
  • Summer – Saladin invites his brother Turan-Shah to join him in Cairo. He brings with him his family and retinue but also a substantial army provided by Nur al-Din. Turan-Shah is welcomed by Al-Adid as a friend.[9]
  • August 2123 – At the Battle of the Blacks, Saladin crushes a rebellion by Sudanese forces (50,000 men) of the Fatimid army, along with a number of Egyptian emirs and commoners. He never again has to face a military uprising from Cairo.[10]
  • Winter – Saladin supported by reinforcements from Nur al-din, defeats a Crusader-Byzantine force under Amalric I near Damietta. During the 3-month siege, the Crusaders are forced to retreat to Palestine.[11]

By topic[edit]

Art and Science[edit]

  • Eleanor of Aquitaine leaves the English court of Henry II, to establish her own court in Poitiers. It will become known as a center of courtly love. Richard I accompanies his mother and is made heir to Aquitaine.

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 314. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  2. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman, VIIIe-XIIIe siècle: L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 110. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.
  3. ^ Warren, W. L. (1961). King John. University of California Press. p. 37.
  4. ^ Moody, T. W.; Martin, F. X., eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork: Mercier Press. p. 370.
  5. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 311. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  6. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 311–312. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  7. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 312. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  8. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Commander 12 - Saladin, p. 13. ISBN 978-1-84908-317-1.
  9. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Commander 12 - Saladin, pp. 16–17. ISBN 978-1-84908-317-1.
  10. ^ Lyons, Malcolm Cameron; Jackson, D. E. P. (1982). Saladin: The Politics of the Holy War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 34–36. ISBN 0-521-31739-8..
  11. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 314–316. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  12. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 312. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.