1169

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1169 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1169
MCLXIX
Ab urbe condita1922
Armenian calendar618
ԹՎ ՈԺԸ
Assyrian calendar5919
Balinese saka calendar1090–1091
Bengali calendar576
Berber calendar2119
English Regnal year15 Hen. 2 – 16 Hen. 2
Buddhist calendar1713
Burmese calendar531
Byzantine calendar6677–6678
Chinese calendar戊子(Earth Rat)
3865 or 3805
    — to —
己丑年 (Earth Ox)
3866 or 3806
Coptic calendar885–886
Discordian calendar2335
Ethiopian calendar1161–1162
Hebrew calendar4929–4930
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1225–1226
 - Shaka Samvat1090–1091
 - Kali Yuga4269–4270
Holocene calendar11169
Igbo calendar169–170
Iranian calendar547–548
Islamic calendar564–565
Japanese calendarNin'an 4 / Kaō 1
(嘉応元年)
Javanese calendar1076–1077
Julian calendar1169
MCLXIX
Korean calendar3502
Minguo calendar743 before ROC
民前743年
Nanakshahi calendar−299
Seleucid era1480/1481 AG
Thai solar calendar1711–1712
Tibetan calendar阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
1295 or 914 or 142
    — to —
阴土牛年
(female Earth-Ox)
1296 or 915 or 143
Lady Rosamund Clifford (the Fair)

Year 1169 (MCLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

  • Late Summer – Emperor Manuel I (Komnenos) sends a embassy to Egypt to demand tribute, and threatens the country with war when they refuse to pay it. The Byzantine fleet under Admiral Andronikos Kontostephanos sets out from the Hellespont; 60 war galleys are sent to Palestine. with money for "the knights of Jerusalem". Andronikos with the rest of the fleet sails to Cyprus, at which he defeats a patrolling squadron of 6 Fatimid ships.[1]

Europe[edit]

England[edit]

Ireland[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • Spring – An Zangid expedition under General Shirkuh accompanied by his nephew Saladin invades Egypt. King Amalric I of Jerusalem orders his fleet to return to Acre and retreats with the Crusaders back to Palestine.
  • January 8 – Shirkuh enters Cairo, leaving the Zangid army encamped outside the city. He goes to the palace, where the 18-year-old Fatimid caliph Al-Adid welcomes him with ceremonial gifts and promised money.[5]
  • January 18Shawar, Fatimid vizier and de facto ruler, is invited to join Shirkuh on a pilgrimage to the tomb of Al-Shafi'i. Underway he and his escort is taken prisoner, on orders from Al-Adid Shawar is decapitated.[6]
  • March 23 – Shirkuh dies from over-eating after a 2-month reign.[7] He is succeeded by Saladin, who is appointed chief vizier of the Fatimid Caliphate. He takes over as commander of Nur al-Din's forces in Egypt.[8]
  • Summer – Saladin invites his brother Turan-Shah to join him in Cairo. He brings with him his family and retinue but also a substantial army provided by Nur al-Din. Turan-Shah is welcomed by Al-Adid as a friend.[9]
  • August 23 – Saladin crushes a rebellion by Sudanese forces (50,000 men) of the Fatimid army, along with a number of Egyptian emirs and commoners. He never again had to face a military uprising from Cairo.[10]
  • Winter – Saladin supported by reinforcements from Nur al-din, defeats a Crusader-Byzantine force under Amalric I near Damietta. During the 3-month siege, the Crusaders are forced to retreat to Palestine.[11]

By topic[edit]

Art and Science[edit]

  • Eleanor of Aquitaine leaves the English court of Henry II, to establish her own court in Poitiers. It will become known as a center of courtly love. Richard I accompanies his mother and is made heir to Aquitaine.

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 314. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  2. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman, VIIIe-XIIIe siècle: L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 110. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.
  3. ^ Warren, W. L. (1961). King John. University of California Press. p. 37.
  4. ^ Moody, T. W.; Martin, F. X., eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork: Mercier Press. p. 370.
  5. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 311. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  6. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 311–312. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  7. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 312. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  8. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Commander 12 - Saladin, p. 13. ISBN 978-1-84908-317-1.
  9. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Commander 12 - Saladin, pp. 16–17. ISBN 978-1-84908-317-1.
  10. ^ Lyons, M. C.; Jackson, D. E. P. (1984). Saladin: The Politics of the Holy War, pp. 34–36. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-31739-9.
  11. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 314–316. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  12. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 312. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.