1170 Siva

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1170 Siva
Discovery [1]
Discovered by E. Delporte
Discovery site Uccle – Belgium
Discovery date 29 September 1930
Designations
MPC designation 1170 Siva
Named after
Shiva (Hindu Deity)[2]
1930 SQ
Mars-crosser[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 27 June 2015 (JD 2457200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 84.93 yr (31,020 days)
Aphelion 3.0235 AU
Perihelion 1.6286 AU
2.3260 AU
Eccentricity 0.2998
3.55 yr (1,296 days)
288.14°
Inclination 22.185°
0.9220°
59.308°
Earth MOID 0.7256 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 10.37 km[4]
12.13±0.89 km[5]
5 h[3]
5.22±0.01 h[6]
4.98 h[a]
3.5 h[7]
0.1751[4]
0.128±0.020[5]
B–V = 0.864
U–B = 0.452
Tholen = S
S[3]
12.43

1170 Siva, provisional designation 1930 SQ, is an eccentric, stony asteroid and large Mars-crosser from the innermost regions of the asteroid belt, about 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Belgian astronomer Eugène Delporte at the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Uccle on 29 September 1930.[8]

The S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.6–3.0 AU once every 3 years and 7 months (1,296 days). Its orbit shows a high eccentricity of 0.30 and is significantly tilted by 22 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has a rotation period of about 5 hours[a] and an albedo of 0.18 and 0.13, based on observations collected by the IRAS and Akari satellites, respectively.[4][5] With an absolute magnitude (H) of 12.4, it is brighter than several other, well-known Mars-crossing asteroids[9]

The minor planet is named after Hindu Deity Shiva, often depicted with a third eye on his forehead and a with a snake around his neck.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b CALL (2011) web: rotation period 4.98 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.1 mag. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (1170) Siva
  1. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1170 Siva (1930 SQ)" (2015-10-17 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved November 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1170) Siva. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 98. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (1170) Siva". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved November 2015. 
  6. ^ Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1170) Siva". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved November 2015. 
  7. ^ Székely, P.; Kiss, L. L.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Sárneczky, K.; Csák, B.; Váradi, M.; et al. (August 2005). "CCD photometry of 23 minor planets". Planetary and Space Science 53 (9): 925–936. arXiv:astro-ph/0504462. Bibcode:2005P&SS...53..925S. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2005.04.006. Retrieved November 2015. 
  8. ^ "1170 Siva (1930 SQ)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved November 2015. 
  9. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: orbital class (MCA) and H < 12.5 (mag)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. 

External links[edit]