1179 Mally

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"Mally" redirects here. For the Austrian philosopher, Ernst Mally.
1179 Mally
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Max Wolf
Discovery site Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory
Discovery date 19 March 1931
Designations
MPC designation 1179
1931 FD
main belt
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 85.09 yr (31078 days)
Aphelion 3.0672 AU (458.85 Gm)
Perihelion 2.1694 AU (324.54 Gm)
2.6183 AU (391.69 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.17145
4.24 yr (1547.5 d)
11.490°
0° 13m 57.468s / day
Inclination 8.7071°
6.8108°
234.06°
Earth MOID 1.171 AU (175.2 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.99135 AU (297.902 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.369
Physical characteristics
46.6917 h (1.94549 d)
12.8[3]

1179 Mally is an asteroid that was discovered by Max Wolf on March 19, 1931, and given the provisional designation 1931 FD.[1] It was named after the discoverer's daughter-in-law. It became a lost asteroid for 55 years after its initial discovery. In 1986, Mally was rediscovered by Lutz D. Schmadel, Richard Martin West and Hans-Emil Schuster, who remeasured the original discovery plates and computed alternative search ephemerides. This allowed them to find the body very near to its predicted position. In addition, historic photographic plates from the Palomar Sky Survey (1956–1958), the UK Schmidt Telescope (Australia), and the ESO Schmidt Telescope (Chile) confirmed the rediscovery.[4][5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". IAU: Minor Planet Center. Retrieved December 13, 2008. 
  2. ^ "(1179) Mally". AstDyS. Italy: University of Pisa. Retrieved December 13, 2008. 
  3. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1179 Mally (1931 FD)" (2015-03-24 last obs). Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  4. ^ Brian G. Marsden (December 5, 1986). "International Astronomical Union Circular 4278". Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. Retrieved December 28, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Long Lost Planet Found Again" (Press release). Garching, Germany: European Southern Observatory. December 4, 1986. Retrieved December 28, 2012. 
  6. ^ Schmadel, L. D.; West, R. M. (1988). "Recovery of the long lost minor planet (1179) Mally". Astronomische Nachrichten. Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, and ESO. 309 (3): 223–225. Bibcode:1988AN....309..223S. doi:10.1002/asna.2113090318. ISSN 0004-6337. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 

External links[edit]