1208 Troilus

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1208 Troilus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 31 December 1931
Designations
MPC designation 1208 Troilus
Named after
Troilus
(Greek mythology)[2]
1931 YA · 1965 WK
Jupiter trojan[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 84.29 yr (30786 days)
Aphelion 5.7317 AU (857.45 Gm)
Perihelion 4.7684 AU (713.34 Gm)
5.2500 AU (785.39 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.091741
12.03 yr (4393.81 d)
139.40°
0° 4m 54.959s / day
Inclination 33.541°
48.551°
296.56°
Earth MOID 3.88231 AU (580.785 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 0.00433901 AU (649,107 km)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.658
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 103.34 km[4]
111.36±2.36 km[5]
100.48±1.10 km[6]
103.31 km (derived)[3]
Mean radius
51.67±1.95 km
56.17 h (2.340 d)[1][7]
24 h[8]
63.8±0.5 h[9]
0.0419[4]
0.037±0.002[5]
0.041±0.006[6]
0.0397 (derived)[3]
0.0419±0.003[1]
B–V = 0.693
U–B = 0.314
Tholen = FCU
F[3]
8.99

1208 Troilus, provisional designation 1931 YA, is a heavily tilted, large and dark Jupiter trojan, about 103 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany on 31 December 1931.[10]

The carbonaceous asteroid has a relatively rare F-type spectrum, classified as a FCU-type in the Tholen taxonomy system. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 4.8–5.7 AU once every 12.03 years (4,394 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.09 and is significantly inclined by 34 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has a rotation period of 56 hours[7] with a more recent but provisional 2014-measurement of 63 hours.[9] The body's albedo amounts to 0.04, according to the surveys carried out by the space-spaced missions, IRAS, Akari, and WISE/NEOWISE.[4][5][6]

The minor planet was named after the young Trojan prince Troilus, from Greek mythology. He is the son of King Priam (also see 884 Priamus), who in a medieval legend loved Cressida (see 548 Kressida) and lost her to Diomedes (see 1437 Diomedes). Troilus was killed by Achilles (see 588 Achilles) in the Trojan War.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1208 Troilus (1931 YA)" (2015-02-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1208) Troilus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 101. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1208) Troilus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  7. ^ a b Molnar, Lawrence A.; Haegert, Melissa J.; Hoogeboom, Kathleen M. (June 2008). "Lightcurve Analysis of an Unbiased Sample of Trojan Asteroids". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (2): 82–84. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...82M. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  8. ^ French, L. M. (November 1987). "Rotation properties of four L5 Trojan asteroids from CCD photometry". Icarus: 325–341.MIT–supportedresearch. Bibcode:1987Icar...72..325F. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(87)90178-3. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1208) Troilus". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  10. ^ "1208 Troilus (1931 YA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 

External links[edit]