1235 Schorria

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1235 Schorria
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 18 October 1931
Designations
MPC designation 1235 Schorria
Named after
Richard Schorr
(astronomer)[2]
1931 UJ · 1988 HD
Mars-crosser · Hungaria[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 83.87 yr (30633 days)
Aphelion 2.2050 AU (329.86 Gm)
Perihelion 1.6153 AU (241.65 Gm)
1.9101 AU (285.75 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.15435
2.64 yr (964.26 d)
20.620°
0° 22m 24.024s / day
Inclination 25.004°
12.962°
43.652°
Earth MOID 0.660282 AU (98.7768 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.24371 AU (485.252 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.809
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 5.04 km (calculated)[3]
9 km[4]:103
12±4 (generic)[5]
1265±80 h[4]
3.3±0.02 h[6]
1,265 h (52.7 d)[1]
0.40 (assumed)[3]
B–V = 0.750
U–B = 0.330
Tholen = CX[1]
C[3]
12.68[1]
13.1[7][8]

1235 Schorria, provisional designation 1931 UJ, is an asteroid from the innermost region of the asteroid belt, about 9 kilometers in diameter. The Mars-crosser is one of the slowest rotating asteroids known to exist. It was discovered on 18 October 1931, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany.[9]

The asteroid is classified as both, C-type and X-type on the Tholen scheme. It is a member of the Hungaria family, which form the innermost dense concentration of asteroids in the Solar System. The body orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.6–2.2 AU once every 2 years and 8 months (964 days). Its orbit is tilted by 25 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic and shows an eccentricity of 0.15.[1] Contrary to the expected low albedo for dark, carbonaceous CX-type asteroids, the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) assumes a high albedo of 0.40 for the body. This is rather typical for the descendants of the E-belt, a hypothesized population of primordial asteroids, from which the E-type Hungarian asteroids with high inclinations and a semi-major axis of 1.9 AU are thought to have originated.[3]

Based on light-curve observations conducted at the U.S. Palmer Divide Observatory in Colorado during February through April 2009, it has an outstandingly long rotation period of 1265±80 hours, or about 52 days, with a high brightness amplitude of 1.40 in magnitude. This makes the asteroid among the slowest rotators known. The body was also a suspected "tumbler". However, no significant evidence of such a non-principal axis rotation could be found.[4]

It was named after Richard Schorr (1867–1951), astronomer at Bergedorf Observatory, Hamburg, who discovered the minor planets 869 Mellena and 1240 Centenaria.[2] The lunar crater Schorr is also named in his honour.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1235 Schorria (1931 UJ)" (2015-08-31 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1235) Schorria. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 103. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 14 December 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (1235) Schorria". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 14 December 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D. (July 2009). "The Lightcurve for the Long-Period Hungaria Asteroid 1235 Schorria". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 36 (3): 102–103. Bibcode:2009MPBu...36..102W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 14 December 2015. 
  5. ^ "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Retrieved 14 December 2015. 
  6. ^ Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1235) Schorria". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 14 December 2015. 
  7. ^ Wisniewski, W. Z.; Michalowski, T. M.; Harris, A. W.; McMillan, R. S. (March 1995). "Photoelectric Observations of 125 Asteroids". Abstracts of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Bibcode:1995LPI....26.1511W. Retrieved 14 December 2015. 
  8. ^ Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 14 December 2015. 
  9. ^ "1235 Schorria (1931 UJ)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 14 December 2015. 

External links[edit]