123 Brunhild

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123 Brunhild
Discovery
Discovered by Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery date 31 July 1872
Designations
Named after
Brynhildr
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 143.71 yr (52490 days)
Aphelion 3.0183 AU (451.53 Gm)
Perihelion 2.37594 AU (355.436 Gm)
2.69710 AU (403.480 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.11907
4.43 yr (1617.9 d)
18.08 km/s
96.8286°
0° 13m 21.054s / day
Inclination 6.4142°
307.834°
125.960°
Earth MOID 1.39621 AU (208.870 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.22588 AU (332.987 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.350
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 48 km[1]
Mean radius
23.985±1.3 km
Mass 1.2×1017 kg (assumed)
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0134 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0254 km/s
10.04 h (0.418 d)[1]
0.2134±0.026[1]
Temperature ~170 K
S[1]
11.77 to 14.88
8.9[1]

123 Brunhild is a stony S-type main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by German-American astronomer C. H. F. Peters on July 31, 1872, and named after Brünnehilde, a Valkyrie in Norse mythology. Brunhild has been mistaken for the non-existent variable star KN Gem.[2]

In 1983, 123 Brunhild was observed photometrically from the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, producing an irregular light curve that showed eight extremes, including two minima and two maxima that were more accentuated than the others. This curve indicates an irregular shape or possibly areas with higher albedo, with a rotation period of 10.04 ± 0.02 hours and a brightness variation of 0.16 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[3]

Based upon IRAS observations, the estimated diameter of this asteroid is 47.97 ± 2.6 km with a geometric albedo of 0.2134 ± 0.026.[1] A smaller diameter value of 41.33 ± 1.73 km is obtained from the Midcourse Space Experiment observations, with an accordingly higher albedo of 0.2886 ± 0.0247.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Yeomans, Donald K., "123 Brunhild", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "The International Variable Star Index: KN Gem". American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO). Retrieved 2011-12-31. 
  3. ^ Barucci, M. A.; di Martino, M. (July 1984), "Rotational rates of very small asteroids - 123 Brunhild, 376 Geometria, 437 Rhodia and 1224 Fantasia", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series, 57, pp. 103–106, Bibcode:1984A&AS...57..103B. 
  4. ^ Tedesco, Edward F.; et al. (July 2002), "The Midcourse Space Experiment Infrared Minor Planet Survey", The Astronomical Journal, 124 (124), pp. 583–591, Bibcode:2002AJ....124..583T, doi:10.1086/340960. 

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