12923 Zephyr

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12923 Zephyr
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Lowell Observatory Near-Earth-Object Search
Discovery site Anderson Mesa Station, Flagstaff, Arizona
Discovery date 11 April 1999
Designations
MPC designation 12923 Zephyr
1999 GK4
Apollo asteroid
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 21954 days (60.11 yr)
Aphelion 2.9270 AU (437.87 Gm)
Perihelion 0.99655 AU (149.082 Gm)
1.9618 AU (293.48 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.49202
2.75 yr (1003.6 d)
343.9508°
0° 21m 31.316s / day
Inclination 5.3044°
168.2135°
147.088°
Earth MOID 0.0204477 AU (3.05893 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.39879 AU (358.854 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.717
Proper orbital elements[1][2]
0.49145
5.2425°
130.899 deg / yr
2.75021 yr
(1004.515 d)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.06 km (1.28 mi)[2]
3.891 h (0.1621 d)
3.891 hours[1]
0.176[2]
Surface temp. min mean max
Kelvin[3] 155 K 189 K 266 K
S[1][2]
15.8[1]

12923 Zephyr (1999 GK4) is an Apollo asteroid. Its name is derived from the ancient Greek god of the west wind Zephyrus and suggested by M. Smitherman.[1] This asteroid is classified as a PHA due to its low Earth MOID; however, the asteroid poses no threat within the next 100 years and is therefore not on the Sentry Risk Table.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "12923 Zephyr". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 12923. Retrieved 9 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d "(12923) Zephyr". NEODyS. University of Pisa. Retrieved 29 November 2015. 
  3. ^ "Planetary Habitability Calculators". Planetary Habitability Laboratory. University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo. Retrieved 29 November 2015. 
  4. ^ "Sentry Risk Table". Near Earth Object Program. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 29 November 2015. Retrieved 29 November 2015. 

External links[edit]