1373 Cincinnati

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1373 Cincinnati
Discovery [1][2]
Discovered by E. Hubble
Discovery site Mount Wilson Obs.
Discovery date 30 August 1935
Designations
MPC designation 1373 Cincinnati
Named after
Cincinnati Obs.[3]
1935 QN
main-belt (outer)
Orbital characteristics[1][4]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 80.57 yr (29430 days)
Aphelion 4.4979 AU (672.88 Gm)
Perihelion 2.3464 AU (351.02 Gm)
3.4221 AU (511.94 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.31434
6.33 yr (2312.3 d)
302.24°
0° 9m 20.484s / day
Inclination 38.931°
297.47°
99.255°
Earth MOID 1.63326 AU (244.332 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.77953 AU (266.214 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.718
Physical characteristics
5.28 h (0.220 d)
Temperature ~151 K[citation needed]
SMASS = Xk
11.6

1373 Cincinnati, provisional designation 1935 QN, is an asteroid of the outer main-belt, discovered by the famous American astronomer Edwin Hubble at Mount Wilson Observatory on August 30, 1935. It was his only asteroid discovery.

The X-type asteroid has an extremely inclined, cometary-like orbit of 39 degrees to the ecliptic.[1][5] Cincinnati is similar to the Cybele asteroids.[6]

Recommended by the Minor Planet Center, the asteroid is named after the Cincinnati Observatory, whose staff provided most of the orbit computations.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1373 Cincinnati (1935 QN)" (2015-07-11 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 27 April 2016. 
  2. ^ http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/lists/NumberedMPs.html
  3. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1373) Cincinnati. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 111. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  4. ^ "The Asteroid Orbital Elements Database". astorb. Lowell Observatory. 
  5. ^ Spectral properties of asteroids in cometary orbits
  6. ^ Dynamical evolution of the Cybele asteroids, V. Carruba, D. Nesvorny, M. E. Huaman, (2015)

External links[edit]