151 Abundantia

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151 Abundantia
Discovery[1]
Discovered by J. Palisa
Discovery date 1 November 1875
Designations
MPC designation (151) Abundantia
Named after
Abundantia
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 131.24 yr (47936 d)
Aphelion 2.6792 AU (400.80 Gm)
Perihelion 2.5049 AU (374.73 Gm)
2.5921 AU (387.77 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.033623
4.17 yr (1524.3 d)
141.90°
0° 14m 10.212s / day
Inclination 6.4348°
38.872°
130.92°
Earth MOID 1.51246 AU (226.261 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.28656 AU (342.065 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.409
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 45.37±0.9 km
9.864 h (0.4110 d)
0.1728±0.007[3]
0.173[4]
S[5]
9.1

151 Abundantia is a stony main belt asteroid. It was discovered by Johann Palisa on November 1, 1875, from the Austrian Naval Observatory in Pula. The name was chosen by Edmund Weiss of the Vienna Observatory; although the name refers to Abundantia, a Roman goddess of luck, it was also chosen to celebrate the increasing numbers of asteroids that were being discovered in the 1870s.[6]

Information from A. Harris as of March 1, 2001: 151 Abundantia is an S class (stony) asteroid with a diameter of 45.37 km and H = 9.24 .1728 and albedo of 0.03.

The light curve collected over 6 nights from 2/16/2002 to 3/10/2002 confirmed the rotational period to be 19.718h.

Data from 2001 shows a diameter of 45.37 km.[7]

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