1544 in poetry

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List of years in poetry (table)
In literature
1541
1542
1543
1544
1545
1546
1547

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

Events[edit]

Works published[edit]

  • Vittoria Colonna, Canzoniere ("Songbook"), lyric poems—mostly sonnets, but also canzoni and capitoli in terza rima, keeping to classical Petrarchan style; the first section refers to her late husband, the second to religion and morals;[1] a fourth edition of her amatory and elegiac poems, including a larger proportion of pious works, published in Venice; Italy
  • Bonaventure des Périers, Recueil des Œuvres de feu Bonaventure des Périers, including his poems, published following his suicide, in Lyon, France
  • Clément Marot, Œuvres, edition in definitive arrangement, in Lyon, France
  • Maurice Scève, Délie, objet de plus haute vertu ("Delia, Object of the Highest Virtue"), lyric poetry, the first French canzoniere of love poems,[2] inspired by the style of Petrarch, the poem dedicated to his young student, Pernette du Guillet;[3] made up of 449 decasyllabic dizains (traditional 10-line strophes) and a prefatory huitain (eight-line strophe); illustrated with 50 emblematic woodcuts; the work for which the author is best known; France[2]

Births[edit]

Death years link to the corresponding "[year] in poetry" article:

Deaths[edit]

Birth years link to the corresponding "[year] in poetry" article:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bondanella, Peter, and Julia Conaway Bondanella, co-editors, "Colonna, Vittoria" article, p 124, Dictionary of Italian Literature, Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1979
  2. ^ a b France, Peter, editor, The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French, 1993, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-866125-8
  3. ^ Web page titled "Maurice Scève (1500-1562)", retrieved May 17, 2009. [http://www.webcitation.org/5gv31SvJZ Archived 2009-05-20.
  4. ^ Preminger, Alex; Brogan, T. V. F.; et al. (1993). The New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics. New York: MJF Books/Fine Communications.