161 Athor

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161 Athor
161Athor (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 161 Athor based on its light curve.
Discovery[1]
Discovered byJames Craig Watson
Discovery siteDetroit Observatory
Discovery date19 April 1876
Designations
MPC designation(161) Athor
Pronunciation/ˈæθər/
Named after
Hathor
Main belt[2]
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc116.50 yr (42551 d)
Aphelion2.70593 AU (404.801 Gm)
Perihelion2.05285 AU (307.102 Gm)
2.37939 AU (355.952 Gm)
Eccentricity0.137237
3.67 yr (1340.6 d)
348.807°
0° 16m 6.737s / day
Inclination9.05986°
18.6090°
295.007°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions44.19±3.3 km[2]
Mean diameter[4]
47.0±0.2 km
circular fit[5]
7.280 h (0.3033 d)[2]
7.281 ± 0.001 hours[6]
7.288 ± 0.007 hours[7]
0.1980±0.033[2][4]
M[8]
9.15[2][9]

161 Athor is an M-type Main belt asteroid that was discovered by James Craig Watson on April 19, 1876, at the Detroit Observatory[1] and named after Hathor, an Egyptian fertility goddess. An occultation by Athor was observed, on October 15, 2002, resulting in an estimated diameter of 47.0 kilometres (29.2 mi).[5]

Photometric observations of the minor planet in 2010 gave a rotation period of 7.2798±0.0001 h with an amplitude of 0.19±0.02 in magnitude. This result is consistent with previous determinations.[10] The spectra is similar to that of carbonaceous chondrites, with characteristics of ferric oxides and little or no hydrated minerals.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". IAU: Minor Planet Center. Archived from the original on February 2, 2009. Retrieved December 20, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "161 Athor". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  3. ^ "(161) Athor". AstDyS. Italy: University of Pisa. Retrieved December 20, 2008.
  4. ^ a b Tedesco; et al. (2004). "Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey (SIMPS)". IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on January 17, 2010. Retrieved December 27, 2008.
  5. ^ a b Dunham & Herald (2008). "Asteroid Occultations". EAR-A-3-RDR-OCCULTATIONS-V6.0. Planetary Data System. Retrieved December 27, 2008.
  6. ^ Pilcher & Higgins (2008). "Period Determination for 161 Athor". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (4): 147. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..147P.
  7. ^ Debehogne & Zappala (1980). "Photoelectric lightcurves of the asteroids 139 Juewa and 161 Athor, obtained with the 50 CM photometric telescope at ESO, La Silla". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series. 42: 85–89. Bibcode:1980A&AS...42...85D.
  8. ^ Neese (2005). "Asteroid Taxonomy". EAR-A-5-DDR-TAXONOMY-V5.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on January 17, 2010. Retrieved December 27, 2008.
  9. ^ Tholen (2007). "Asteroid Absolute Magnitudes". EAR-A-5-DDR-ASTERMAG-V11.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on June 17, 2012. Retrieved December 27, 2008.
  10. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (July 2011), "Rotation Period Determinations for 28 Bellona, 81 Terpsichore, 126 Velleda 150 Nuwa, 161 Athor, 419 Aurelia, and 632 Pyrrha", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 38 (3): 156−158, Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..156P.
  11. ^ Busarev, V. V.; Taran, M. N. (November 2002), "On the spectral similarity of carbonaceous chondrites and some hydrated and oxidized asteroids", Proceedings of Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - ACM 2002. International Conference, 29 July - 2 August 2002, Berlin, Germany. Ed. Barbara Warmbein. ESA SP-500., Noordwijk, Netherlands: ESA Publications Division, pp. 933−936, Bibcode:2002ESASP.500..933B, ISBN 92-9092-810-7.

External links[edit]