1632 Sieböhme

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1632 Sieböhme
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 26 February 1941
Designations
MPC designation (1632) Sieböhme
Named after
Siegfried Böhme (astronomer)[2]
1941 DF · 1930 UJ
1942 JC · 1947 RB
1951 MN · 1956 TM
A917 SO
main-belt · (middle)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 99.22 yr (36,239 days)
Aphelion 3.0198 AU
Perihelion 2.2915 AU
2.6557 AU
Eccentricity 0.1371
4.33 yr (1,581 days)
68.735°
0° 13m 39.72s / day
Inclination 5.7171°
199.80°
127.21°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 25.16±7.20 km[4]
26.05±8.68 km[5]
26.56 km (derived)[3]
28.842±0.383 km[6]
29.351±0.105 km[7]
29.38±0.41 km[8]
56.65±0.04 h[9]
56.81±0.01 h[10]
56.8129±0.1652 h[11]
0.043±0.008[8]
0.0477 (derived)[3]
0.05±0.03[4]
0.05±0.04[5]
0.060±0.003[7]
0.0643±0.0074[6]
S[3]
11.3[6] · 11.597±0.002 (R)[11] · 11.7[1][5][8] · 11.80[3][4] · 11.80±0.24[12]

1632 Sieböhme, provisional designation 1941 DF, is an asteroid and relatively slow rotator from the middle region of the asteroid belt, approximately 27 kilometers in diameter.

It was discovered on 26 February 1941, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany.[13] It was later named after ARI-astronomer Siegfried Böhme.[2]

Orbital characteristics[edit]

Sieböhme orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.3–3.0 AU once every 4 years and 4 months (1,581 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.14 and an inclination of 6° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] In 1907, the body was first identified as A917 SO at the Crimean Simeis Observatory, extending its observation arc by 34 years prior to its official discovery observation.[13]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In August 2012, two rotational lightcurves of Sieböhme were obtained at the Palomar Transient Factory in California, and by Italian astronomer Albino Carbognani. These lightcurves gave a rotation period of 56.8129 and 56.81 hours with a brightness variation of 0.44 and 0.45 magnitude, respectively (U=2/2).[10][11] One month later, photometric observations by amateur astronomer Pierre Antonini gave a period of 56.65 hours and an amplitude of 0.47 magnitude (U=2).[9] As most minor planets rotate within 2 to 20 hours around their axis, Sieböhme has a relatively long period, despite not being a slow rotator.

According to the survey carried out by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Sieböhme measures between 25.16 and 29.38 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo between 0.043 and 0.064.[4][5][6][7][8] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) derives an albedo of 0.0477 and a diameter of 26.56 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 11.80. Although CALL derives an albedo that is darker than that of a carbonaceous asteroid, it classifies Sieböhme as a stony asteroid.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named in honor of German astronomer Siegfried Böhme (1909–1996), staff member at Astronomisches Rechen-Institut in Heidelberg since 1949. He improved upon the orbital elements of many asteroids, in particular upon 919 Ilsebill.[2] The approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1977 (M.P.C. 3931).[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1632 Siebohme (1941 DF)" (2016-12-13 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1632) Sieböhme. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 129. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (1632) Sieböhme". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; et al. (September 2016). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astronomical Journal. 152 (3): 12. arXiv:1606.08923Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016AJ....152...63N. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/3/63. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; et al. (December 2015). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 814 (2): 13. arXiv:1509.02522Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015ApJ...814..117N. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/814/2/117. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c d Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1632) Sieböhme". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Carbognani, Albino (January 2014). "Asteroids Lightcurves at Oavda: 2012 June - 2013 March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (1): 4–8. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41....4C. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  12. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  13. ^ a b "1632 Siebohme (1941 DF)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  14. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 

External links[edit]