1656 Suomi

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1656 Suomi
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Y. Väisälä
Discovery site Turku Obs.
Discovery date 11 March 1942
Designations
MPC designation (1656) Suomi
Named after
Finland (country)[2]
1942 EC · 1955 HL
Mars-crosser[1] · Hungaria[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 73.90 yr (26,993 days)
Aphelion 2.1094 AU
Perihelion 1.6461 AU
1.8778 AU
Eccentricity 0.1234
2.57 yr (940 days)
98.005°
0° 22m 58.8s / day
Inclination 25.068°
175.57°
287.51°
Earth MOID 0.7539 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 7.86±0.7 km (IRAS:3)[4]
7.9 km[5]
2.42±0.02 h[5]
2.583±0.004 h[6]
2.5879±0.0002 h[7]
2.5879±0.0003 h[8]
2.59±0.01 h[9][10][11]
62.16 h (wrong)[12]
0.1556±0.032 (IRAS:3)[4]
0.157[5]
Tholen = S[1] · S[13][14]
12.9[1][15] · 12.97±0.31[16] · 13.13±0.11[5] · 13.146±0.1[14][17] · 13.16[4]

1656 Suomi, provisional designation 1942 EC, is a stony Hungaria asteroid and sizable Mars-crosser from the innermost regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 7.9 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 11 March 1942, by Finnish astronomer Yrjö Väisälä at Turku Observatory in Southwest Finland.[3] It was named for the country Finland.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Suomi is a member of the Hungaria family, which form the innermost dense concentration of asteroids in the Solar System. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.6–2.1 AU once every 2 years and 7 months (940 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.12 and an inclination of 25° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

It is also classified as a Mars-crossing asteroid, since its perihelion – the point in its orbit, where it is nearest to the Sun – is less than the average orbital distance of the planet Mars (1.666 AU). Suomi's observation arc begins on the preceding night of its discovery, with an observation taken at Johannesburg Observatory on 10 March 1942.[3]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the Tholen taxonomy, Suomi is a stony S-type asteroid.[1]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the survey carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, Suomi measures 7.86 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.156,[4] making it one of the largest Mars crossing asteroid with a known diameter.[18] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) agrees with IRAS, and adopts an albedo of 0.157 and a diameter of 7.9 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 13.146.[14]

Rotation period[edit]

Since 1991, a large number of rotational lightcurves of Suomi have been obtained from photometric observations (also see infobox). CALL adopts a rotation period of 2.583 hours with a brightness variation of 0.20 magnitude (U=3).[14]

Naming[edit]

As with 1453 Fennia, this minor planet was named after Finland (Finnish: Suomi).[2] Naming citation was published before November 1977 (M.P.C. 3932).[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1656 Suomi (1942 EC)" (2016-02-03 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1656) Suomi. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 132. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c "1656 Suomi (1942 EC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Wisniewski, W. Z.; Michalowski, T. M.; Harris, A. W.; McMillan, R. S. (March 1995). "Photoelectric Observations of 125 Asteroids". Abstracts of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Bibcode:1995LPI....26.1511W. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  6. ^ Warner, Brian D. (July 2009). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2008 December - 2009 March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 36 (3): 109–116. Bibcode:2009MPBu...36..109W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  7. ^ Warner, Brian D. (October 2012). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2012 March - June". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (4): 245–252. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..245W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  8. ^ Warner, Brian D. (January 2016). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2015 June-September". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (1): 57–65. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43...57W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  9. ^ Stephens, Robert D. (December 2004). "Photometry of 1196 Sheba, 1341 Edmee, 1656 Suomi, 2577 Litva, and 2612 Kathryn". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 31 (4): 95–97. Bibcode:2004MPBu...31...95S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  10. ^ Brinsfield, James W. (March 2008). "The Rotation Periods of 1465 Autonoma, 1656 Suomi 4483 Petofi, 4853 Marielukac, and (85275) 1994 LY". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (1): 23–24. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...23B. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  11. ^ Warner, Brian D. (July 2014). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2014 January-March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (3): 144–155. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..144W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  12. ^ Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1656) Suomi". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  13. ^ Sanchez, Juan A.; Michelsen, René; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas (July 2013). "Surface composition and taxonomic classification of a group of near-Earth and Mars-crossing asteroids". Icarus. 225 (1): 131–140. arXiv:1302.4449Freely accessible. Bibcode:2013Icar..225..131S. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.02.036. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  14. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1656) Suomi". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  15. ^ Faure, Gerard; Garret, Lawrence (December 2007). "Suggested Revised H Values of Selected Asteroids: Report Number 3". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (4): 95–99. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34...95F. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  16. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  17. ^ Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  18. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: orbital class (MCA) and diameter > 0 (km)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2015-05-26. 
  19. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 

External links[edit]