1657 Roemera

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1657 Roemera
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 6 March 1961
Designations
MPC designation 1657 Roemera
Named after
Elizabeth Roemer
(astronomer)[2]
1961 EA · 1932 AB
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 27 June 2015 (JD 2457200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 83.43 yr (30,473 days)
Aphelion 2.9031 AU
Perihelion 1.7933 AU
2.3482 AU
Eccentricity 0.2363
3.60 yr (1,314 days)
34.334°
Inclination 23.376°
105.33°
54.332°
Earth MOID 0.8808 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 7.67±0.22 km[4]
8.04 km (caculated)[3]
34.0 h[5]
4.5±1 h[6]
0.220±0.030[4]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
Tholen = S
S[3]
12.84

1657 Roemera, provisional designation 1961 EA, is a stony asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, about 8 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by astronomer Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory near Bern, Switzerland on 6 March 1961.[7]

The asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.8–2.9 AU once every 3.6 years (1,314 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.24 and is tilted by 23 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. The S-type asteroid has a long rotation period of 34 hours[5] and a relatively high albedo of 0.22.[4]

It was named by the discoverer in honor American female astronomer Elizabeth Roemer (b. 1929), U.S. Naval Observatory, in appreciation of her untiring and successful efforts to advance the knowledge of the motions and physical properties of comets and minor planets.[2] Roemer herself discovered the asteroids 1930 Lucifer and 1983 Bok.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1657 Roemera (1961 EA)" (2015-06-16 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved November 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1657) Roemera. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 132. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1657) Roemera". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (January 2009). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2008 May - September". Bulletin of the Minor Planets (Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers) 36 (1): 7–13. Bibcode:2009MPBu...36....7W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved November 2015. 
  6. ^ Wisniewski, W. Z.; Michalowski, T. M.; Harris, A. W.; McMillan, R. S. (March 1995). "Photoelectric Observations of 125 Asteroids". Abstracts of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Bibcode:1995LPI....26.1511W. Retrieved November 2015. 
  7. ^ "1657 Roemera (1961 EA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved November 2015. 

External links[edit]