16 Aurigae

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16 Aurigae
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Auriga
Right ascension 05h 18m 10.570s[1]
Declination +33° 22′ 17.81″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 4.547[2]
4.8 / 10.6[3]
Characteristics
Spectral type K2.5IIIb[4]
U−B color index +1.26[5]
B−V color index +1.26[5]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) -27.5[citation needed] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 31.63 ± 0.53[1] mas/yr
Dec.: -160.73 ± 0.25[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 14.04 ± 0.58[1] mas
Distance 232 ± 10 ly
(71 ± 3 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 5.828[citation needed]
Details[6]
Mass 1.1 M
Radius 18.8 R
Luminosity 112 L
Temperature 4276 K
Orbit[3]
Primary 16 Aur A
Companion 16 Aur B
Period (P) 434.8 d
Semi-major axis (a) 7.24 ± 1.59 mas"
Eccentricity (e) 0.1
Inclination (i) 52.93 ± 9.46°
Longitude of the node (Ω) 56.20 ± 11.65°
Periastron epoch (T) 2448348.1172 ± 17.1872
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
40°
Other designations
BD+33° 1000, HD 34334, HIP 24727, HR 1726, SAO 57853, PPM 70153, ADS 3872
Database references
SIMBAD data

16 Aurigae is a spectroscopic binary[7] star in the constellation Auriga. Its apparent magnitude is 4.547.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b Høg, E.; et al. (2000). "The Tycho-2 catalogue of the 2.5 million brightest stars". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 355: L27–L30. Bibcode:2000A&A...355L..27H. 
  3. ^ a b "Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars". United States Naval Observatory. Retrieved 8 April 2017. 
  4. ^ "* 16 Aur". 
  5. ^ a b Mermilliod, J.-C. (1986). "Compilation of Eggen's UBV data, transformed to UBV (unpublished)". Catalogue of Eggen's UBV data. Bibcode:1986EgUBV........0M. 
  6. ^ Massarotti, Alessandro; Latham, David W.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Fogel, Jeffrey (2008). "Rotational and Radial Velocities for a Sample of 761 Hipparcos Giants and the Role of Binarity". The Astronomical Journal. 135: 209. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/135/1/209. 
  7. ^ Griffin, R. F. (2008). "Spectroscopic binary orbits from photoelectric radial velocities - Paper 198: 48 Piscium, 16 Aurigae, 5 Herculis, and Beta Scuti". The Observatory. 128: 21–56. Bibcode:2008Obs...128...21G.