1717 Arlon

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1717 Arlon
Discovery [1]
Discovered by S. Arend
Discovery site Uccle – Belgium
Discovery date 8 January 1954
Designations
MPC designation 1717 Arlon
Named after
Arlon
(Municipality of Belgium)[2]
1954 AC · 1930 YU
1941 BJ · 1946 UB
1951 GQ · 1954 CE
1977 FQ3 · 1978 PC5
A915 CC
main-belt · Flora[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 85.24 yr (31134 days)
Aphelion 2.4798 AU (370.97 Gm)
Perihelion 1.9123 AU (286.08 Gm)
2.1961 AU (328.53 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.12919
3.25 yr (1188.7 d)
42.151°
0° 18m 10.296s / day
Inclination 6.1893°
340.50°
116.10°
Known satellites 1 [4]
(Diameter: 4 km)[4]
(Period: 18.2 hours)[5][6]
Earth MOID 0.938172 AU (140.3485 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.66706 AU (398.986 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.650
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 8.57±0.58 km[7]
9.128±0.166 km[8]
9 km[4]
9.15 km[9]
8.87±0.74 km[10]
5.1484 h (0.21452 d)[a][1][5]
5.148 h[11]
5.1082±0.0006 h[12]
5.148±0.001 h[6]
5.261±0.005 h[12]
5.1477±0.00009 h[a]
5.148±0.001 h[13]
0.167±0.024[7]
0.2492±0.0420[8]
0.225[3][9]
0.315±0.166[10]
Tholen = S
S[3]
12.2

1717 Arlon, provisional designation 1954 AC, is a stony, binary asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, about 9 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Belgian astronomer Sylvain Arend at the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Uccle, on 8 January 1954.[14]

The asteroid is a member of the Flora family, a large group or S-type asteroids dwelling in the inner main-belt. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.9–2.5 AU once every 3 years and 3 months (1,188 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.13 and is tilted by 6 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has a rotation period of 5.1 hours and an albedo of about 0.23, based on observations carried out by the Akari, WISE and NEOWISE missions.[7][8][9][10]

In 2006 a team of astronomers at the Ondřejov Observatory near Prague, Czech Republic, announced the light-curve analysis suggests that Arlon has a asteroid moon orbiting once every 18.2 hours, at a distance of 16 kilometers. The moon is approximately 4 kilometers in diameter.[4][5][6]

It is named after the Belgian town, municipality and capital of province, Arlon in Belgian Luxembourg, situated on a hill above the headwaters of the Semoise. The Orolaunum of the Romans was a station on the Antoninian way connecting Reims and Trier.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pravec (2005): rotation period 5.1484±0.0004 with a brightness amplitude of 0.08. Also, Pravec (2011): rotation period of 5.14822±0.00009, 5.1496±0.0005 and 5.1477±0.0004 with a corresponding brightness amplitude of 0.07, 0.09 and 0.10 in magnitude. Summary figures at Asteroid Lightcurve Database for (1717) Arlon
  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1717 Arlon (1954 AC)" (2015-10-12 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1717) Arlon. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 136. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (1717) Arlon". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d Wm. Robert Johnston (13 October 2006). "(1717) Arlon". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 12 April 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-07. 
  5. ^ a b c Cooney, W.; Gross, J.; Terrell, D.; Stephens, R.; Pravec, P.; Kusnirak, P.; et al. (January 2006). "(1717) Arlon". Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams. Bibcode:2006CBET..369....1C. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Brinsfield, James W. (April 2009). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Via Capote Observatory: 2008 4th Quarter". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 36 (2): 64–66. Bibcode:2009MPBu...36...64B. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407free to read. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  9. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  10. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; Cabrera, M. S. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794free to read. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  11. ^ Cooney, W.; Gross, J.; Terrell, D.; Pravec, P.; Kusnirak, P.; Pray, D.; et al. (May 2006). "(1717) Arlon". Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams. Bibcode:2006CBET..504....1C. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  12. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1717) Arlon". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  13. ^ Oey, Julian (October 2014). "Lightcurve Analysis of Asteroids from Blue Mountains Observatory in 2013". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (4): 276–281. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..276O. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  14. ^ "1717 Arlon (1954 AC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 

External links[edit]