1721 Wells

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1721 Wells
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Indiana Asteroid Program
Discovery site Goethe Link Obs.
Discovery date 3 October 1953
Designations
MPC designation 1721 Wells
Named after
Herman Wells
(Indiana University)[2]
1953 TD3 · 1944 DA
1958 QE · A905 CG
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 72.08 yr (26326 days)
Aphelion 3.2903 AU (492.22 Gm)
Perihelion 3.0032 AU (449.27 Gm)
3.1468 AU (470.75 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.045614
5.58 yr (2038.9 d)
357.29°
0° 10m 35.652s / day
Inclination 16.126°
317.35°
135.97°
Earth MOID 2.03688 AU (304.713 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.81491 AU (271.507 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.146
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 40.03 km
Mean radius
20.015 ± 0.75 km
0.0528 ± 0.004
10.9

1721 Wells, provisional designation 1953 TD3, is a dark asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 40 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by the Indiana Asteroid Program at the U.S. Goethe Link Observatory near Brooklyn, Indiana, on 3 October 1953.[3]

The asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 3.0–3.3 AU once every 5 years and 7 months (2,039 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.05 and is tilted by 16 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has an albedo of 0.053.[1]

The minor planet was named in honor of Herman B. Wells (1902–2000), longtime president and chancellor of Indiana University. Almost single handed, he changed Indiana University from a small locally oriented college into a world class institution of higher learning. Over the years, he also served the cause of higher education on the national and international level with great distinction and statesmanship.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1721 Wells (1953 TD3)" (2015-09-23 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1721) Wells. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 137. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 17 November 2015. 
  3. ^ "1721 Wells (1953 TD3)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 17 November 2015. 

External links[edit]