1728 Goethe Link

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1728 Goethe Link
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Indiana Asteroid Program
Discovery site Goethe Link Obs.
Discovery date 12 October 1964
Designations
MPC designation 1728 Goethe Link
Named after
Goethe Link
(observatory's founder)[2]
1964 TO · 1943 OA
1952 WH · 1955 KE
1956 VD · 1964 UB
1967 JD
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 72.65 yr (26535 days)
Aphelion 2.7934 AU (417.89 Gm)
Perihelion 2.3361 AU (349.48 Gm)
2.5647 AU (383.67 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.089150
4.11 yr (1500.2 d)
238.73°
0° 14m 23.856s / day
Inclination 7.1829°
240.55°
66.247°
Earth MOID 1.33032 AU (199.013 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.37712 AU (355.612 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.416
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 18.18±1.09 km [4]
14.58±0.33 km [5]
15.60 km (calculated)[3]
81 h (3.4 d) [1][6]
0.194±0.025[4]
0.251±0.032[5]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
S[3]
11.4

1728 Goethe Link, provisional designation 1964 TO, is a stony asteroid and possibly slow rotator from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, about 16 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by the Indiana Asteroid Program at the U.S. Goethe Link Observatory near Brooklyn, Indiana, on 12 October 1964.[7]

The S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.3–2.8 AU once every 4.11 years (1,500 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.09 and is tilted by 7 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has an albedo of 0.19 and 0.25, based on observations from the Akari and WISE/NEOWISE space missions.[4][5] The asteroid might be a slow rotator with a provisional light-curve analysis made in 2005, rendering a long rotation period of 81 hours.[6]

The minor planet was named in honor of Indianapolis surgeon Dr. Goethe Link. He was an enthusiastic amateur astronomer and generous supporter of astronomy, who built the Goethe Link Observatory in the late 1930s and donated it to Indiana University in 1948.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1728 Goethe Link (1964 TO)" (2015-03-24 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 21 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1728) Goethe Link. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 137. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1728) Goethe Link". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; Cabrera, M. S. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794free to read. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1728) Goethe Link". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 

External links[edit]