1810–1811 United States House of Representatives election in New Hampshire

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New Hampshire law required a candidate to receive votes from a majority of voters (10%). In the August 27, 1810 initial election, only two candidates won a majority, so a second election was held April 1, 1811 for the remaining three seats, after the congressional term began but before the Congress formally convened. The data from the source used give majorities to all the top five candidates, suggesting that the data are incomplete.

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
New Hampshire at-large
5 seats on a general ticket
Daniel Blaisdell Federalist 1808 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
First ballot (August 27, 1810):
Josiah Bartlett Jr. (Democratic-Republican) 10.2%
Samuel Dinsmoor (Democratic-Republican) 10.1%
George Sullivan (Federalist) 10.1%
William Hale (Federalist) 10.1%
Roger Vose (Federalist) 10.0%
Daniel Blaisdell (Federalist) 10.0%
Obed Hall (Democratic-Republican) 10.0%
John Adams Harper (Democratic-Republican) 9.9%
James Wilson (Federalist) 9.8%
David Morrill (Democratic-Republican) 9.8%[1]

Second ballot (April 1, 1811):
John Adams Harper (Democratic-Republican) 21.2%
Obed Hall (Democratic-Republican) 21.2%
George Sullivan (Federalist) 19.2%
William Hale (Federalist) 19.1%
Daniel Blaisdell (Federalist) 18.9%
Roger Vose (Federalist) 0.3%[2]
John Curtis Chamberlain Federalist 1808 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
William Hale Federalist 1808 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Nathaniel Appleton Haven Federalist 1808 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic-Republican gain.
James Wilson Federalist 1808 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Federalist hold.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NH At-Large". January 4, 2011. Retrieved October 9, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  2. ^ "NH At-Large - Runoff". January 4, 2011. Retrieved October 9, 2018 – via OurCampaigns.com.