1864 Daedalus

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1864 Daedalus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by T. Gehrels
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date 24 March 1971
Designations
MPC designation 1864 Daedalus
Named after
Daedalus
(Greek mythology)[2]
1971 FA
Apollo, NEO
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 44.99 yr (16433 days)
Aphelion 2.3587 AU (352.86 Gm)
Perihelion 0.56276 AU (84.188 Gm)
1.4607 AU (218.52 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.61474
1.77 yr (644.84 d)
48.177°
0° 33m 29.808s / day
Inclination 22.212°
6.6431°
325.62°
Earth MOID 0.26874 AU (40.203 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.10838 AU (465.007 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 4.336
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 3.7 km[1]
2.722±0.114 km[3]
3.00 km (derived)[4]
Mean radius
1.85 km
8.572 h (0.3572 d)[1][5]
8.57 h[6]
8.575±0.002 h[7]
0.273±0.055[3]
0.20 (assumed)[4]
B–V = 0.830
U–B = 0.500
SQ (Tholen), Sr (SMASS)
14.85

1864 Daedalus, provisional designation 1971 FA, is a stony asteroid classified as a near-Earth object, that measures about 3 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Dutch–American astronomer Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory, California, on 24 March 1971.[8]

It is a member of the Apollo asteroids, a group of near-Earth object with an Earth-crossing orbit. Daedalus orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.6–2.4 AU once every 1.77 years (645 days) and has a SQ/Sr spectral type with an albedo of 0.2 or more.[3][4] Its rotation period has been measured to take 8.572 hours.[5][6][7] It has an Earth Minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) of 0.2688 AU.[1]

It is named after the Greek mythological figure Daedalus, the builder of King Minos' labyrinth, who was subsequently imprisoned there with his son Icarus. They escaped on wings of feathers and wax, but whereas Icarus was drowned when the wax in his wings melted, Daedalus went on to Sicily and built there a temple to Apollo. There is also a lunar crater called Daedalus.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1864 Daedalus (1971 FA)" (2015-06-13 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 20 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1864) Daedalus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 149. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (1864) Daedalus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Pravec, P.; Wolf, M.; Varady, M.; Bárta, P. (December 1995). "CCD Photometry of 6 Near-Earth Asteroids". Earth 71 (3): 177–187 (EM&P Homepage). Bibcode:1995EM&P...71..177P. doi:10.1007/BF00612955. Retrieved November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Gehrels, T.; Roemer, E.; Marsden, B. G. (September 1971). "Minor Planets and Related Objects. VIL Asteroid 1971 FA". Astronomical Journal 76: 607 (AJ Homepage). Bibcode:1971AJ.....76..607G. doi:10.1086/111169. Retrieved November 2015. 
  7. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (July 2015). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2015 January - March". The Minor Planet Bulletin 42 (3): 172–183. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42..172W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved November 2015. 
  8. ^ "1864 Daedalus (1971 FA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved November 2015. 

External links[edit]