1865 Cerberus

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1865 Cerberus
1865Cerberus (Lightcurve Inversion).png
Lightcurve-based 3D-model of Cerberus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Kohoutek
Discovery site Bergedorf Obs.
Discovery date 26 October 1971
Designations
MPC designation (1865) Cerberus
Pronunciation /ˈsɜːrbərəs/ SUR-ber-əs
Named after
Cerberus (Greek mythology)[2]
1971 UA
NEO · Apollo[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 45.05 yr (16,456 days)
Aphelion 1.5844 AU
Perihelion 0.5757 AU
1.0801 AU
Eccentricity 0.4669
1.12 yr (410 days)
205.19°
0° 52m 41.16s / day
Inclination 16.095°
212.93°
325.26°
Earth MOID 0.1567 AU · 61 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 1.2 km (Gehrels)[1]
1.608 km[4]
1.61 km (taken)[5]
1.611±0.013 km[6]
6.800±0.006 h[7]
6.80328±0.00001 h[8]
6.803286±0.000005 h[9]
6.8039 h[a]
6.804±0.003 h[10]
6.81 h[b]
6.810±0.003 h[11]
6.87 h[12]
0.1118[4]
0.136±0.021[6]
0.22
0.50±0.29[13]
S (Tholen)[1] · S (SMASS)[1]
S[5][14]
B–V = 0.790[1]
U–B = 0.442[1]
16.45±0.07 (R)[a] · 16.84[1][6] · 16.965±0.04[4][5] · 16.97±0.04[7] · 16.97±0.13[11]

1865 Cerberus (/ˈsɜːrbərəs/ SUR-ber-əs), provisional designation 1971 UA, is a stony asteroid and near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 1.6 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 26 October 1971, by Czech astronomer Luboš Kohoutek at the Hamburger Bergedorf Observatory, Germany, and named for Cerberus from Greek mythology.[2][3]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Cerberus orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.6–1.6 AU once every 1 years and 1 month (410 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.47 and an inclination of 16° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

The Apollo asteroid has an Earth minimum orbital intersection distance of 0.1567 AU (23,400,000 km), which corresponds to 61 lunar distances. It passes within 30 gigametres (Gm) of the Earth 7 times from the year 1900 to the year 2100, each time at a distance of 24.4 Gm to 25.7 Gm. It also makes close approaches to Mars and Venus.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the Tholen and SMASS taxonomy, Cerberus is a common stony S-type asteroid,[1] composed of 65% plagioclase and 35% pyroxene.[15] It has a rotation period of 6.804 hours and a geometric albedo of 0.220.[1][5]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet is named after the figure from Greek mythology, Cerberus, a three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades, the Underworld. His capture marked the last of the twelve labors of Hercules. It is also the name of an extinct constellation, Cerberus, now contained in the eastern part of Hercules.[2] (It should not be confused with Kerberos, a moon of the dwarf planet Pluto.) The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1977 (M.P.C. 3758).[16]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pravec (2008) web, summary figures at LCDB
  2. ^ Pravec (1999) web, summary figures at LCDB

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1865 Cerberus (1971 UA)" (2016-11-14 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1865) Cerberus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. pp. 149–150. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "1865 Cerberus (1971 UA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1865) Cerberus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Harris, A. W.; Young, J. W. (October 1989). "Asteroid lightcurve observations from 1979-1981". Icarus: 314–364. Bibcode:1989Icar...81..314H. ISSN 0019-1035. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(89)90056-0. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  8. ^ Durech, J.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Baransky, A. R.; Breiter, S.; Burkhonov, O. A.; Cooney, W.; et al. (November 2012). "Analysis of the rotation period of asteroids (1865) Cerberus, (2100) Ra-Shalom, and (3103) Eger - search for the YORP effect". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 547: 9. Bibcode:2012A&A...547A..10D. arXiv:1210.2219Freely accessible. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219396. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  9. ^ Hanus, J.; Delbo', M.; Durech, J.; Alí-Lagoa, V. (August 2015). "Thermophysical modeling of asteroids from WISE thermal infrared data - Significance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties". Icarus. 256: 101–116. Bibcode:2015Icar..256..101H. arXiv:1504.04199Freely accessible. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.04.014. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  10. ^ Skiff, Brian A.; Bowell, Edward; Koehn, Bruce W.; Sanborn, Jason J.; McLelland, Kyle P.; Warner, Brian D. (July 2012). "Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Asteroid Photometric Survey (NEAPS) - 2008 May through 2008 December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (3): 111–130. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..111S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b Wisniewski, W. Z.; Michalowski, T. M.; Harris, A. W.; McMillan, R. S. (March 1995). "Photoelectric Observations of 125 Asteroids". Abstracts of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Bibcode:1995LPI....26.1511W. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  12. ^ Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, Gy.; Kiss, L. L. (June 1999). "CCD observations of 11 faint asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement: 363–368. Bibcode:1999A&AS..137..363S. doi:10.1051/aas:1999251. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  13. ^ Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, D. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Benner, L. A. M.; et al. (September 2011). "ExploreNEOs. V. Average Albedo by Taxonomic Complex in the Near-Earth Asteroid Population". The Astronomical Journal. 142 (3): 12. Bibcode:2011AJ....142...85T. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  14. ^ Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbó, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael (January 2014). "Physical characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed near-Earth objects". Icarus. 228: 217–246. Bibcode:2014Icar..228..217T. arXiv:1310.2000Freely accessible. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.10.004. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  15. ^ L.A. Lebofsky; M.L. Nelson. "Compositions of Near-Earth Asteroids" (PDF). University of Arizona. Retrieved 6 November 2015. 
  16. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 

External links[edit]