1866 Sisyphus

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1866 Sisyphus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 5 December 1972
Designations
MPC designation 1866 Sisyphus
Named after
Sisyphus
(Greek mythology)[2]
1972 XA
Apollo, NEO
Mars-crosser
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 27 June 2015 (JD 2457200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 60.35 yr (22,042 days)
Aphelion 2.9133 AU
Perihelion 0.8742 AU
1.8938 AU
Eccentricity 0.5383
2.61 yr (952 days)
143.30°
Inclination 41.185°
63.533°
293.06°
Earth MOID 0.1045 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 8.48 km[3]
5.72±0.07 km[4]
6.597±0.189 km[5]
6.859 km[6]
8 km[a]
8.9 km[7]
2.400 h[8][a]
2.7 h[9]
2.401±0.001 h[10]
2.424±0.001 h[11]
0.15[3]
0.19±0.07[12]
0.360±0.010[4]
0.255±0.049[5]
0.3719[6]
0.14[7]
SMASS = S[1]
S[13]
12.4[1]

1866 Sisyphus (/ˈsɪsfəs/ SIS-i-fəs), provisional designation 1972 XA, is a stony, binary asteroid, classified as near-Earth object. It measures about 7 kilometers in diameter and is the largest member of the Apollo asteroids, a subgroup of near-Earth asteroids which cross the orbit of Earth. It was discovered by astronomer Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory near Bern, Switzerland on 5 December 1972.[14][15]

This S-type asteroid (composed of rocky silicates) orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.9–2.9 AU once every 2 years and 7 months (952 days). It has a rotation period of 2.4 hours and a geometric albedo of 0.150. Its orbit is highly eccentric (0.54) and tilted by 41 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. The asteroid's Earth minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) is 0.1045 AU (15,630,000 km; 9,710,000 mi).[1]

In 1985, this object was detected with radar from the Arecibo Observatory at a distance of 0.25 AU. The measured radar cross-section was 8 square kilometers.[16] During the radar observations, a small satellite was detected, although its existence was not reported until December 2007. As a result, little is known about the moon.

The asteroid is named after the Sisyphus of Greek mythology and refers to the cruel king of Ephyra, punished by being given the task of rolling a large stone up to a hill in the underworld, only to have it roll down again each time he neared the top.[2]

Sisyphus will pass 0.11581 AU (17,325,000 km; 10,765,000 mi) from Earth on November 24, 2071,[17] and will peak at roughly apparent magnitude 9.3 on November 26, 2071.[18] When it was discovered it peaked at magnitude 9.0 on November 25, 1972. It is one of the brightest near-Earth asteroids. With a measured mean diameter in the range of 5.7–8.9 kilometers, it the largest of the Earth-crossing asteroids, comparable in size to the Chicxulub object whose impact contributed to the extinction of the dinosaurs.[19] Larger near-Earth asteroids which are neither classified as Apollos nor Earth-crossers include 1036 Ganymed (32 km), 3552 Don Quixote (19 km), 433 Eros (17 km), and 4954 Eric (10.8 km).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1866 Sisyphus (1972 XA)" (2015-06-02 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved November 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1866) Sisyphus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 150. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Delbó, Marco; Harris, Alan W.; Binzel, Richard P.; Pravec, Petr; Davies, John K. (November 2003). "Keck observations of near-Earth asteroids in the thermal infrared". Icarus 166 (1): 116–130. Bibcode:2003Icar..166..116D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.07.002. Retrieved November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; McMillan, R. S.; Spahr, T.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved November 2015. 
  7. ^ a b Delbo, Marco; Walsh, Kevin; Mueller, Michael; Harris, Alan W.; Howell, Ellen S. (March 2011). "The cool surfaces of binary near-Earth asteroids". Icarus 212 (1): 138–148. Bibcode:2011Icar..212..138D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2010.12.011. Retrieved November 2015. 
  8. ^ Schober, H. J.; Erikson, A.; Hahn, G.; Lagerkvist, C. I.; Oja, T. (November 1993). "Physical Studies of Asteroids. Part XXVI. Rotation and Photoelectric Photometry of Asteroids 323, 350, 582, 1021 and 1866". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement 101 (3): 507. Bibcode:1993A&AS..101..499S. Retrieved November 2015. 
  9. ^ Szabó, Gy. M.; Csák, B.; Sárneczky, K.; Kiss, L. L. (August 2001). "Photometric observations of 9 Near-Earth Objects". Astronomy and Astrophysics. arXiv:astro-ph/0106017. Bibcode:2001A&A...375..285S. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20010813. Retrieved November 2015. 
  10. ^ Stephens, Robert D.; French, Linda, M.; Warner, Brian D.; Wasserman, Lawrence H. (October 2011). "The Curse of Sisyphus". Bulletin of the Minor Planets (Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers) 38 (4): 212–213. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..212S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved November 2015. 
  11. ^ Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1866) Sisyphus". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved November 2015. 
  12. ^ Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; Cohen, M.; et al. (August 2011). "Thermal Model Calibration for Minor Planets Observed with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer/NEOWISE". The Astrophysical Journal 736 (2): 9. Bibcode:2011ApJ...736..100M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/736/2/100. Retrieved November 2015. 
  13. ^ "LCDB Data for (1866) Sisyphus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved November 2015. 
  14. ^ "1866 Sisyphus (1972 XA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved November 2015. 
  15. ^ http://echo.jpl.nasa.gov/~lance/binary.neas.html
  16. ^ Ostro, S. J.; et al. (October 1991), "Asteroid radar astrometry", Astronomical Journal 102, pp. 1490–1502, Bibcode:1991AJ....102.1490O, doi:10.1086/115975. 
  17. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: 1866 Sisyphus (1972 XA)" (last observation: 2013-07-26). Retrieved 2013-10-30. 
  18. ^ "(1866) Sisyphus Ephemerides for November 2071". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 2013-10-30. 
  19. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: asteroids and NEOs and H < 13 (mag)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2013-10-31. 

External links[edit]