1866 Sisyphus

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1866 Sisyphus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 5 December 1972
Designations
MPC designation (1866) Sisyphus
Pronunciation /ˈsɪsɪfəs/ SIS-i-fəs
Named after
Sisyphus (Greek mythology)[2]
1972 XA
Apollo · NEO[1][3] · Mars-crosser
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 61.55 yr (22,482 days)
Aphelion 2.9131 AU
Perihelion 0.8737 AU
1.8934 AU
Eccentricity 0.5386
2.61 yr (952 days)
85.918°
0° 22m 41.88s / day
Inclination 41.202°
63.498°
293.09°
Known satellites 1 [a][4][5][6]
(Orbital period of 27.16±0.05 h)
Earth MOID 0.1037 AU · 40.4 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 5.72±0.07 km[7]
6.597±0.189 km[8]
6.859 km[9]
6.86 km (taken)[10]
8 km[4][a]
8.48 km[11]
8.9 km[12]
2.3909±0.0004 h[6]
2.400 h[13]
2.4 h[b]
2.401±0.001 h[5]
2.424±0.001 h[14]
2.7 h[15]
0.14[12]
0.15[11]
0.19±0.07[16]
0.255±0.049[8]
0.360±0.010[7]
0.3719[9]
SMASS = S[1] · S[17]
11.7±0.2 (R)[b] · 12.4[1] · 12.51±0.149[9][10] · 13.0[7][8][11]

1866 Sisyphus (/ˈsɪsɪfəs/ SIS-i-fəs), provisional designation 1972 XA, is a binary[6] stony asteroid, near-Earth object and the largest member of the Apollo group, approximately 7 kilometers in diameter.

It was discovered on 5 December 1972, by Swiss astronomer Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory near Bern, Switzerland, and named after Sisyphus from Greek mythology.[3][18]

Orbit and classification[edit]

This S-type asteroid (composed of rocky silicates) orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 0.9–2.9 AU once every 2 years and 7 months (952 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.54 and an inclination of 41° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

The Apollo asteroid has an Earth minimum orbit intersection distance of 0.1037 AU (15,500,000 km), which corresponds to 40.4 lunar distances.[1] It will pass 0.11581 AU (17,325,000 km) from Earth on 24 November 2071,[19] and will peak at roughly apparent magnitude 9.3 on 26 November 2071.[20] When it was discovered it peaked at magnitude 9.0 on 25 November 1972. It is one of the brightest near-Earth asteroids.

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the SMASS classification, Sisyphus is a common stony S-type asteroid.[1]

Binary system[edit]

In 1985, this object was detected with radar from the Arecibo Observatory at a distance of 0.25 AU. The measured radar cross-section was 8 square kilometers.[4][a] During the radar observations, a small minor-planet moon was detected around Sisyphus, although its existence was not reported until December 2007. Robert Stephens confirmed that it is a suspected binary,[5] and Brian Warner added additional weight to this conclusion, giving 27.16±0.05 hours as the satellite's orbital period, longer than the 25 hours previously reported by Stephens.[6]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

With a measured mean diameter in the range of 5.7–8.9 kilometers, it the largest of the Earth-crossing asteroids, comparable in size to the Chicxulub object whose impact contributed to the extinction of the dinosaurs.[21] Larger near-Earth asteroids which are neither classified as Apollos nor Earth-crossers include 1036 Ganymed (32 km), 3552 Don Quixote (19 km), 433 Eros (17 km), and 4954 Eric (10.8 km).

Naming[edit]

This minor planet is named after Sisyphus from Greek mythology and refers to the cruel king of Ephyra, punished by being given the task of rolling a large stone up to a hill in the underworld, only to have it roll down again each time he neared the top.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1977 (M.P.C. 3758).[22]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Benner (1985), gives a diameter of 8 kilometer. Summary figures listed at LCDB
  2. ^ a b Pravec (1998web), gives a rotation period of 2.4 hours. Summary figures listed at LCDB

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1866 Sisyphus (1972 XA)" (2016-08-15 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1866) Sisyphus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 150. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "1866 Sisyphus (1972 XA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Ostro, S. J.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, J. F.; Shapiro, I. I.; Hine, A. A.; Velez, R.; et al. (October 1991). "Asteroid radar astrometry". Astronomical Journal: 1490–1502.ResearchsupportedbyNASA. Bibcode:1991AJ....102.1490O. doi:10.1086/115975. ISSN 0004-6256. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Stephens, Robert D.; French, Linda, M.; Warner, Brian D.; Wasserman, Lawrence H. (October 2011). "The Curse of Sisyphus". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (4): 212–213. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..212S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d Warner, Brian D. (October 2016). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2016 April-July". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (4): 311–319. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..311W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  10. ^ a b "LCDB Data for (1866) Sisyphus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c Delbó, Marco; Harris, Alan W.; Binzel, Richard P.; Pravec, Petr; Davies, John K. (November 2003). "Keck observations of near-Earth asteroids in the thermal infrared". Icarus. 166 (1): 116–130. Bibcode:2003Icar..166..116D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.07.002. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  12. ^ a b Delbo, Marco; Walsh, Kevin; Mueller, Michael; Harris, Alan W.; Howell, Ellen S. (March 2011). "The cool surfaces of binary near-Earth asteroids". Icarus. 212 (1): 138–148. Bibcode:2011Icar..212..138D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2010.12.011. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  13. ^ Schober, H. J.; Erikson, A.; Hahn, G.; Lagerkvist, C. I.; Oja, T. (November 1993). "Physical Studies of Asteroids. Part XXVI. Rotation and Photoelectric Photometry of Asteroids 323, 350, 582, 1021 and 1866". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement. 101 (3): 507. Bibcode:1993A&AS..101..499S. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  14. ^ Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1866) Sisyphus". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  15. ^ Szabó, Gy. M.; Csák, B.; Sárneczky, K.; Kiss, L. L. (August 2001). "Photometric observations of 9 Near-Earth Objects". Astronomy and Astrophysics: 285–292. arXiv:astro-ph/0106017Freely accessible. Bibcode:2001A&A...375..285S. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20010813. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  16. ^ Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (August 2011). "Thermal Model Calibration for Minor Planets Observed with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer/NEOWISE". The Astrophysical Journal. 736 (2): 9. Bibcode:2011ApJ...736..100M. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.472.4936Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/736/2/100. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  17. ^ Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbó, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael (January 2014). "Physical characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed near-Earth objects". Icarus. 228: 217–246. arXiv:1310.2000Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014Icar..228..217T. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.10.004. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  18. ^ http://echo.jpl.nasa.gov/~lance/binary.neas.html
  19. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: 1866 Sisyphus (1972 XA)" (last observation: 2013-07-26). Retrieved 2013-10-30. 
  20. ^ "(1866) Sisyphus Ephemerides for November 2071". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 2013-10-30. 
  21. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: asteroids and NEOs and H < 13 (mag)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2013-10-31. 
  22. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 

External links[edit]