1867 Deiphobus

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1867 Deiphobus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by C. U. Cesco
A. G. Samuel
Discovery site El Leoncito Complex
Discovery date 3 March 1971
Designations
MPC designation 1867 Deiphobus
Pronunciation diːˈɪfəbəs (dee-if'-ə-bəs)
Named after
Deiphobus
(Greek mythology)[2]
1971 EA
Jupiter trojan[3]
(Trojan camp)[4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 45.68 yr (16,685 days)
Aphelion 5.3506 AU
Perihelion 4.9057 AU
5.1281 AU
Eccentricity 0.0434
11.61 yr (4,242 days)
212.83°
0° 5m 5.64s / day
Inclination 26.913°
283.70°
359.32°
Jupiter MOID 0.1581 AU
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.7830
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 118.220±1.616 km[5][6]
122.65 km (derived)[7]
122.67±3.9 km[8]
131.31±1.87 km[9]
15.72±0.01 h[10]
24 h[11]
51.70±0.05 h[a]
58.62±0.03 h[12]
58.66±0.18 h[13]
0.037±0.001[9]
0.0396 (derived)[7]
0.0422±0.003[8]
0.060±0.009[5][6]
B–V = 0.734[1]
U–B = 0.232[1]
Tholen = D[1] · D[7][14]
8.3[1][5] · 8.47±0.10[14] · 8.61[8][9] · 8.68[7][11]

1867 Deiphobus (DEE-if'-Ə-bəs), provisional designation 1971 EA, is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 123 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 3 March 1971, by Argentine astronomers Carlos Cesco and A. G. Samuel at the Leoncito Astronomical Complex in Argentina.[3]

The D-type minor planet orbits the Sun at a distance of 4.9–5.4 AU once every 11 years and 7 months (4,242 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.04 and an inclination of 27° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 1994 were used to build a light curve showing a slow rotation period of 58.66 ± 0.18 hours with a brightness variation of 0.27 ± 0.03 magnitude.[13]

According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Deiphobus measures between 118.2 and 131.3 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo between 0.037 and 0.060.[5][6][8][9] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link derives an albedo of 0.040, and calculates a diameter of 122.7 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 8.68.[7]

It was named after the Trojan warrior, Deiphobus, son of Priamus (also see 108 Hecuba and 884 Priamus).[2] Naming citation was published before November 1977 (M.P.C. 3935).[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Melita (2012), gives a rotation period of 51.70±0.05. Summary figures listed at www.minorplanet.info/PHP/GenerateALCDEFPage_Local.php?AstInfo=1867%7CDeiphobus
  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1867 Deiphobus (1971 EA)" (2016-11-06 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1867) Deiphobus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 150. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "1867 Deiphobus (1971 EA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  4. ^ "List of Jupiter Trojans". Minor Planet Center. 20 August 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R. (November 2012). "WISE/NEOWISE Observations of the Jovian Trojan Population: Taxonomy". The Astrophysical Journal. 759 (1): 10. arXiv:1209.1549Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759...49G. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/759/1/49. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (1867) Deiphobus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c d Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey" (PDF). Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  10. ^ French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel R.; Megna, Ralph; Wasserman, Lawrence H. (July 2012). "Photometry of 17 Jovian Trojan Asteroids". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (3): 183–187. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..183F. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b French, L. M. (November 1987). "Rotation properties of four L5 Trojan asteroids from CCD photometry". Icarus: 325–341.MIT–supportedresearch. Bibcode:1987Icar...72..325F. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(87)90178-3. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  12. ^ Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel R.; French, Linda M. (July 2016). "A Report from the L5 Trojan Camp - Lightcurves of Jovian Trojan Asteroids from the Center for Solar System Studies". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (3): 265–270. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..265S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  13. ^ a b Mottola, Stefano; Di Martino, Mario; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carbognani, Albino; Carsenty, Uri; et al. (May 2011). "Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojans. I. Light Curves of 80 Objects". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (5): 32. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..170M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/5/170. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  14. ^ a b Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  15. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 

External links[edit]