18th Legislative District (New Jersey)

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New Jersey's 18th Legislative District
New Jersey Legislative Districts Map (2011) D18 hl.svg
Senator Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
Assembly members Nancy Pinkin (D)
Robert Karabinchak (D)
Registration
Demographics
Population 210,881
Voting-age population 162,296
Registered voters 141,584

New Jersey's 18th Legislative District is one of 40 in the New Jersey Legislature. As of the 2011 apportionment, the district includes the Middlesex County municipalities of East Brunswick Township, Edison Township, Helmetta Borough, Highland Park Borough, Metuchen Borough, South Plainfield Borough and South River Borough.[1][2]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 210,881, of whom 162,296 (77.0%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 124,665 (59.1%) White, 13,433 (6.4%) African American, 435 (0.2%) Native American, 60,509 (28.7%) Asian, 63 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 6,264 (3.0%) from some other race, and 5,512 (2.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 19,092 (9.1%) of the population.[3] The district had 141,584 registered voters as of December 31, 2016, of whom 62,831 (44.4%) were registered as unaffiliated, 57,701 (40.8%) were registered as Democrats, 20,662 (14.6%) were registered as Republicans, and 390 (0.3%) were registered to other parties.[4]

The district had the highest percentage of Asian American residents of any district statewide, with African American, Hispanic and elderly below statewide averages.[citation needed] Registered Democrats outnumbered Republicans by a better than 2 to 1 margin.

Political representation[edit]

The district is represented for the 2016–2017 Legislative Session (Senate, General Assembly) in the State Senate by Patrick J. Diegnan (D, South Plainfield) and in the General Assembly by Nancy Pinkin (D, East Brunswick) and Robert Karabinchak (D, Edison). [5][6]

Apportionment history[edit]

Since the creation of the 40-district legislative map in 1973, the 18th District has always been centered around central Middlesex County and has always included East Brunswick, Edison, and Metuchen in every decennial redistricting. In addition to those three municipalities, the 1973 version of the district included South Brunswick, North Brunswick, Helmetta, Spotswood, Milltown, and South River.[7] For the 1981 redistricting, South Brunswick and South River were shifted to other districts but the 18th picked up Monroe Township and Jamesburg.[8] Under the 1991 redistricting, Monroe, Jamesburg, Helmetta, and Spotswood were removed, but South River was restored to the district.[9] For the 2001 redistricting, South Plainfield was added to the district for the first time, Spotswood and Helmetta returned to the district, and North Brunswick and Milltown were shifted to the 17th District.[10]

Changes to the district made as part of the New Jersey Legislative redistricting in 2011, based on the results of the 2010 United States Census, removed Spotswood Borough (to the 14th Legislative District) and added Highland Park (from the 17th Legislative District).

Election history[edit]

In April 1991, five-term incumbent Frank M. Pelly announced that he would not seek re-election and was named by Governor James Florio to serve as executive director of the New Jersey Lottery.[11] In the 1991 Republican landslide, Jack Sinagra took the Senate seat vacated by Democrat Thomas H. Paterniti, while in the Assembly race, Harriet E. Derman and running mate Jeffrey A. Warsh were elected, knocking off Democratic incumbent George A. Spadoro and his running mate Michael Baker.[12] Derman and Warsh won re-election in 1993, defeating former Assemblymember Thomas H. Paterniti and his running mate Matthew Vaughn.[13]

After Christine Todd Whitman became governor in 1994, she named Derman to head the Department of Community Affairs.[14] Republican Joanna Gregory-Scocchi was chosen by a Republican special convention to fill Derman's vacancy. In a November 1994 special election, early favorite Gregory-Scocchi was defeated by Barbara Buono, after disclosures that Gregory-Scocchi's temporary employment firm had hired illegal immigrants.[15]

In the 1995 elections, the Assembly seats swung back to the Democrats, with Barbara Buono holding onto her seat and her running mate Peter J. Barnes II winning too, defeating Republican incumbent Warsh and his running mate Jane Tousman, despite Republicans outspending the Democrats by a 2-1 margin in the bitterly fought battleground district.[16]

In May 2001, Sinagra announced that he would not run for a fourth term, leaving Barbara Buono as the favorite to pick up the seat for the Democrats.[17][18] Buono went on to win the Senate seat, and in the Assembly Peter J. Barnes II won re-election together with running mate Patrick J. Diegnan, leaving all three legislative seats controlled by Democrats for the first time since 1991.[19] Sinagra resigned from the Senate shortly before the election to become a Port Authority of New York and New Jersey commissioner; North Brunswick Township's attorney David Himelman was appointed after the election to fill the remaining weeks of Sinagra's term.[20][21]

In March 2007, after Peter J. Barnes II was confirmed to a seat on the New Jersey State Parole Board, his son Peter J. Barnes III was chosen to fill his vacant seat in the Assembly by a convention of Democratic party delegates.[22]

In the November 2013 gubernatorial election, Barbara Buono chose not to run for re-election, choosing instead to mount an unsuccessful challenge to Chris Christie's bid for re-election as Governor of New Jersey.[23] In the 18th district, Peter J. Barnes III moved from the Assembly to the Senate, winning Buono's seat against East Brunswick mayor David Stahl in a close race. Barnes's seat in the Assembly was won by East Brunswick Township Councilmember Nancy Pinkin.[24]

Upon his appointment to the State Superior Court, Barnes resigned his Senate seat on April 25, 2016. On May 5, Diegnan was selected without opposition to receive appointment to the Senate seat by the members of the Middlesex County Democratic Organization. A week later, on May 12, Edison Councilman Robert Karabinchak was selected from a ballot of four candidates to receive appointment to Diegnan's Assembly seat. Special elections held on November 8, 2016 elected Diegnan and Karabinchak to serve out the remainder of the terms in their seats.[25]

Senators and Assembly members elected from the district are as follows:[26]

Session Senate Assembly
1974–1975 Bernard J. Dwyer (D) James Bornheimer (D) John H. Froude (D)
1976–1977 James Bornheimer (D) John H. Froude (D)
1978–1979 Bernard J. Dwyer (D)[n 1] 
James Bornheimer (D) John H. Froude (D)
1980–1981 James Bornheimer (D) Thomas H. Paterniti (D)
Seat vacant[n 2]
1982–1983 James Bornheimer (D) Frank M. Pelly (D) Thomas H. Paterniti (D)
1984–1985 Peter P. Garibaldi (R) Frank M. Pelly (D) Thomas H. Paterniti (D)
1986–1987 Frank M. Pelly (D) Thomas H. Paterniti (D)
1988–1989 Thomas H. Paterniti (D) Frank M. Pelly (D) George A. Spadoro (D)
1990–1991[27] Frank M. Pelly (D)[n 3] George A. Spadoro (D)
Michael J. Baker (D)[n 4]
1992–1993 Jack Sinagra (R) Jeffrey A. Warsh (R) Harriet E. Derman (R)
1994–1995[28] Jack Sinagra (R) Jeffrey A. Warsh (R) Harriet E. Derman (R)[n 5]
Joanna Gregory-Scocchi (R)[n 6]
Barbara Buono (D)[n 7]
1996–1997 Peter J. Barnes, Jr. (D) Barbara Buono (D)
1998–1999[29] Jack Sinagra (R)[n 8] 
Peter J. Barnes, Jr. (D) Barbara Buono (D)
2000–2001[30] Peter J. Barnes, Jr. (D) Barbara Buono (D)
David Himelman (R)[n 9]
2002–2003[19] Barbara Buono (D) Peter J. Barnes, Jr. (D) Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
2004–2005[31] Barbara Buono (D) Peter J. Barnes, Jr. (D) Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
2006–2007 Peter J. Barnes, Jr. (D)[n 10] Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
Peter J. Barnes III (D)[n 11]
2008–2009 Barbara Buono (D) Peter J. Barnes III (D) Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
2010–2011[32] Peter J. Barnes III (D) Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
2012–2013 Barbara Buono (D) Peter J. Barnes III (D) Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
2014–2015[33] Peter J. Barnes III (D)[n 12] Nancy Pinkin (D) Patrick J. Diegnan (D)
2016–2017 Nancy Pinkin (D) Patrick J. Diegnan (D)[n 13]
Patrick J. Diegnan (D)[n 13] Robert Karabinchak (D)[n 14]
  1. ^ Resigned January 3, 1981 upon his election to Congress
  2. ^ Dwyer's seat remained vacant for the remainder of the session
  3. ^ Resigned July 1, 1991 to become executive director of the New Jersey Lottery
  4. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on July 15, 1991
  5. ^ Resigned February 8, 1994 to become director of Department of Community Affairs
  6. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on February 8, 1994, defeated in November 1994 special election
  7. ^ Elected in November 1994 special election, sworn in on December 1, 1994
  8. ^ Resigned October 23, 2001 to become a Port Authority of New York and New Jersey commissioner
  9. ^ Appointed to the Senate on November 26, 2001
  10. ^ Resigned March 14, 2007 to become chairman of the New Jersey State Parole Board
  11. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on March 15, 2007
  12. ^ Resigned April 25, 2016 to become a Superior Court judge
  13. ^ a b Appointed to the Senate on May 9, 2016, won November 8, 2016 special election to complete the term
  14. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on May 26, 2016, won November 8, 2016 special election to complete the term

Election results[edit]

Senate[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[34]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bernard J. Dwyer 36,606 63.2
Republican Fuller H. Brooks 21,301 36.8
Total votes 57,907 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bernard J. Dwyer 34,144 57.6
Republican S. Elliott Mayo 23,803 40.2
Independent Edward R. Gavarny 1,281 2.2
Total votes 59,228 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Bornheimer 31,383 52.1
Republican Peter P. Garibaldi 28,853 47.9
Total votes 60,236 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Peter P. Garibaldi 24,397 47.9
Democratic James W. Bornheimer 23,814 46.7
Independent Robert S. Maurer 2,769 5.4
Total votes 50,980 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas H. Paterniti 30,790 59.2
Republican Peter P. Garibaldi 21,253 40.8
Total votes 52,043 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Sinagra 28,638 53.5
Democratic Harry S. Pozycki 24,889 46.5
Total votes 53,527 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Sinagra 36,736 58.2
Democratic Samuel V. Convery, Jr. 25,106 39.8
Voter's Independence Coalition Kevin Michael Criss 1,261 2.0
Total votes 63,103 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack G. Sinagra 35,400 58.5
Democratic Thomas H. Paterniti 25,110 41.5
Total votes 60,510 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[42]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Buono 33,487 65.0
Republican John G. Cito 18,064 35.0
Total votes 51,551 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Buono 18,561 58.5
Republican Richard F. Plechner 13,175 41.5
Total votes 31,736 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Buono 21,365 62.4
Republican Daniel H. Brown 12,896 37.6
Total votes 34,261 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Buono 19,631 60.1
Republican Gloria S. Dittman 13,042 39.9
Total votes 32,673 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter Barnes 25,063 51.9
Republican David Stahl 23,184 48.1
Total votes 48,247 100.0
Special election, November 8, 2016[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan Jr. 50,537 61.7
Republican Roger W. Daley 31,321 38.3
Total votes 81,858 100.0

Assembly[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[34]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James W. Bornheimer 37,384 32.7
Democratic John H. Froude 37,046 32.4
Republican James Genecki 20,051 17.5
Republican George W. Luke 19,487 17.0
American Arthur M. Balogh 225 0.2
American Oris A. Thompson 205 0.2
Total votes 114,398 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1975[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James W. Bornheimer 32,149 31.3
Democratic John H. Froude 31,248 30.4
Republican S. Elliott Mayo 21,224 20.6
Republican Daumants Hazners 18,239 17.7
Total votes 102,860 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James W. Bornheimer 35,683 31.1
Democratic John H. Froude 34,119 29.7
Republican Donald R. Appleby 22,661 19.7
Republican Glenn Berman 22,359 19.5
Total votes 114,822 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1979[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Bornheimer 29,829 31.9
Democratic Thomas H. Paterniti 28,346 30.3
Republican James R. Sheldon 17,974 19.2
Republican Elias L. Schneider 17,264 18.5
Total votes 93,413 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas H. Paterniti 33,295 28.3
Democratic Frank M. Pelly 32,271 27.4
Republican Barbara S. Abbott 26,731 22.7
Republican Bertram Buckler 25,437 21.6
Total votes 117,734 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas H. Paterniti 27,741 28.5
Democratic Frank M. Pelly 27,555 28.3
Republican Doris M. Fleming 21,292 21.9
Republican Donna R. Bowen 20,759 21.3
Total votes 97,347 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1985[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas H. Paterniti 30,169 26.7
Democratic Frank M. Pelly 29,490 26.1
Republican S. Elliott Mayo 27,101 24.0
Republican Michael Leibowitz 26,280 23.2
Total votes 113,040 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank M. Pelly 30,634 30.2
Democratic George A. Spadoro 29,261 28.8
Republican Robert “Dr. Bob” Maurer 21,332 21.0
Republican Doris M. Fleming 20,234 19.9
Total votes 101,461 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1989[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank M. Pelly 39,017 30.3
Democratic George A. Spadoro 38,443 29.9
Republican Cheryl Ann Rickards 25,933 20.2
Republican Charles Eibeler 25,181 19.6
Total votes 128,574 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Harriet Derman 30,946 29.6
Republican Jeff Warsh 29,631 28.4
Democratic George A. Spadoro 22,132 21.2
Democratic Michael Baker 21,674 20.8
Total votes 104,383 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Harriet Derman 36,358 29.9
Republican Jeff Warsh 34,491 28.3
Democratic Thomas H. Paterniti 26,029 21.4
Democratic Matthew Vaughn 24,883 20.4
Total votes 121,761 100.0
Special election, November 8, 1994[52]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Buono 27,229 53.7
Republican Joanna Gregory-Scocchi 23,436 46.3
Total votes 50,665 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1995[53]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara A. Buono 20,530 26.6
Democratic Peter J. Barnes, Jr. 19,531 25.3
Republican Jeff Warsh 17,941 23.3
Republican L. Jane Tousman 16,790 21.8
Independent Frank J. Coury 2,351 3.0
Total votes 77,143 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[54]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Buono 33,248 28.6
Democratic Peter J. Barnes, Jr. 31,781 27.3
Republican Wendy L. Wiebalk 25,729 22.1
Republican Thomas J. Toto 25,612 22.0
Total votes 116,370 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1999[55]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Buono 19,327 31.7
Democratic Peter J. Barnes, Jr. 18,068 29.7
Republican E. Martin Davidoff 11,853 19.5
Republican Norman Van Houten 11,632 19.1
Total votes 60,880 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[56]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter J. Barnes Jr 32,633 33.0
Democratic Patrick Diegnan Jr 30,759 31.1
Republican Norman J. Van Houten 18,152 18.3
Republican Sylvester Fernandez 17,443 17.6
Total votes 98,987 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter J. Barnes Jr 18,032 29.6
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan Jr 16,255 26.7
Republican Robert D. Thuring 13,994 23.0
Republican Jasal Amin 12,636 20.7
Total votes 60,917 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2005[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter J. Barnes Jr 31,605 30.8
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan Jr 29,874 29.1
Republican Daniel Epstein 20,639 20.1
Republican Frank J. Coury 20,530 20.0
Total votes 102,648 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[59]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan Jr 18,858 28.8
Democratic Peter J. Barnes III 18,621 28.4
Republican Joseph Sinagra 14,121 21.6
Republican William England 13,921 21.2
Total votes 65,521 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2009[60]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter J. Barnes 26,658 25.9
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan, Jr 26,317 25.6
Republican Joseph Sinagra 24,091 23.4
Republican Robert Jones 22,727 22.1
Defending Forgotten Taxpayers Katherine Shkolar 1,671 1.6
Defending Forgotten Taxpayers Andrew Tidd 1,351 1.3
Total votes 102,815 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[61]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter J. Barnes, III 18,166 28.6
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan, Jr. 18,050 28.4
Republican Joseph Sinagra 13,996 22.0
Republican Marcia Silva 13,333 21.0
Total votes 63,545 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan Jr. 24,996 27.1
Democratic Nancy Pinkin 24,186 26.2
Republican Robert A. Bengivenga Jr. 21,517 23.3
Republican Lisa Goldhammer 20,559 22.3
United We Stand Sheila Angalet 1,068 1.2
Total votes 92,326 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2015[62]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick J. Diegnan Jr. 16,256 31.9
Democratic Nancy Pinkin 16,113 31.6
Republican Teresa Rose Hutchison 9,432 18.5
Republican Synnove Bakke 9,123 17.9
Total votes 50,924 100.0
Special election, November 8, 2016[63]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Karabinchak 48,513 60.4
Republican Camille Ferraro Clark 31,827 39.6
Total votes 80,340 100.0

References[edit]

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