1901 Harvard Crimson football team

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1901 Harvard Crimson football
National champion (Billingsley)
ConferenceIndependent
1901 record12–0
Head coachBill Reid (1st season)
Home stadiumSoldier's Field
Seasons
← 1900
1902 →
1901 college football independents records
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Harvard         12 0 0
Yale         11 1 1
California         9 0 1
Stetson         1 0 0
Cornell         11 1 0
Dartmouth         10 1 0
Massachusetts         9 1 0
Princeton         9 1 1
Notre Dame         8 1 1
Kentucky U.         7 1 1
Army         5 1 2
Connecticut         8 2 0
Virginia         8 2 0
Texas         8 2 1
Arizona         4 1 0
Washington Agricultural         4 1 0
Nebraska         7 2 0
Western U. of Penn         7 2 1
Lafayette         9 3 0
Utah         3 1 0
Penn         10 5 0
Gallaudet         4 2 2
William & Mary         2 1 1
Columbia         8 5 0
Baylor         5 3 0
Penn State         5 3 0
Ohio State         5 3 1
VMI         4 3 0
Washington         4 3 0
Navy         6 4 1
Delaware         5 4 0
Stanford         3 2 2
Oklahoma         3 2 0
Drake         4 4 0
Detroit         3 3 0
Kansas State         3 4 1
Michigan Agricultural         3 4 1
Oregon         3 4 1
Carlisle         5 7 1
Montana         2 3 0
Oklahoma A&M         2 3 0
Villanova         2 3 0
Arkansas         3 5 0
Kansas         3 5 2
Furman         1 2 1
Texas A&M         1 4 0
Missouri         1 6 1
Maryland         1 7 0
Boston College         1 8 0
Florida Agricultural         0 1 0
Kendall         0 1 0
USC         0 1 0
Rhode Island         0 2 0
Rutgers         0 7 0

The 1901 Harvard Crimson football team was an American football team that represented Harvard University as an independent during the 1901 college football season. In its first season under head coach Bill Reid, the team compiled a 12–0 record and outscored opponents by a total of 254 to 24.[1]

The team was retrospectively named as the national champion by two selectors, the Billingsley Report[2] and Parke H. Davis.[3] A modern authority on college football rankings said, "Indeed, had there been an AP poll in 1901, Harvard would have been #1 by a landslide."[4]

1901Harvardintercollegiate

Nine Harvard players received first-team honors from Walter Camp (WC) or Caspar Whitney (CW) on the 1901 All-America team:

Schedule[edit]

DateOpponentSiteResultAttendanceSource
September 28WilliamsW 16–0[7]
October 2Bowdoin
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA
W 12–0[8]
October 5Bates
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA
W 16–6[9]
October 9Amherst
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA
W 11–0[10]
October 12Columbia
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA (rivalry)
W 18–0[11]
October 16Wesleyan
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA
W 16–0[12]
October 19at ArmyWest Point, NYW 6–0[13]
October 26Carlisle
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA
W 29–0[14]
November 2Brown
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA
W 48–05,000[15]
November 9PennW 33–6[16]
November 16Dartmouth
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA (rivalry)
W 27–12[17]
November 23Yale
  • Soldier's Field
  • Cambridge, MA (rivalry)
W 22–0[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1901 Harvard Crimson Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 27, 2017.
  2. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2015). "National Poll Rankings" (PDF). NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA. p. 108. Retrieved January 4, 2016.
  3. ^ Parke Davis' selection for 1901, as published in the 1935 Spalding's Foot Ball Guide (which he himself edited until his death), was Harvard. (Reference: Okeson, Walter R., ed. (1935). Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 1935. New York: American Sports Publishing Co. p. 233.)
  4. ^ Vautravers, James. "1901 College Football National Championship". Retrieved 2019-09-23. The caption [of the photo above] tells you all you need to know about who was considered national champion at the time: "HARVARD WINS THE INTERCOLLEGIATE CHAMPIONSHIP." Indeed, had there been an AP poll in 1901, Harvard would have been #1 by a landslide. ... The question is, who is right? The Eastern-biased "experts" of 1901, who had no doubt that 12-0 Harvard was the best? Or the "experts" of many decades after the fact, who prefer 11-0 Michigan so much that they do not even see Harvard as sharing the title? Or are they both only half-right, and Michigan and Harvard should be considered co-champions? For some seasons, there are no certain answers to such questions. For this 1901 season, however, there is an easy and unequivocal answer. ... When Harvard met Yale at season's end, it was considered to be for the national championship, and if there had been an AP poll in 1901, Yale might well have finished #2. That is because they were considered to be the top program in college football. ... In any case, this much is clear: Michigan's schedule was far weaker than Harvard's in 1901. ... Harvard played in a much stronger region. And even if you go ahead and wrongly assume that the West was as good as the East, Harvard played 3 top ten teams, and Michigan played none. Because Michigan's best opponent, Northwestern, would still not make a top ten. Michigan had a losing record against Eastern teams both before and after this time. And Michigan's 550-0 proves little to nothing, as history has demonstrated. ... At this point there can be no doubt that Harvard can claim a national championship for 1901. The only question is whether or not Michigan should be considered a co-champion. And I would say this: If you consider Utah 2004 and Boise State 2009 to be national champions, then yes, you could consider Michigan to be one in 1901 also. If not, then you don't have any reason to consider Michigan to be co-champion in 1901. ... In the end, the main thing is that Harvard defeated the other top teams in their own region (Yale, Army, Dartmouth), which also happened to be the best region. If Michigan had at least played and beaten the other top teams in their own region, then I would give them the benefit of the doubt and consider them co-champion for 1901. But Michigan did not even play the other two top teams in their own conference: 9-1-1 Minnesota and 9-0 Wisconsin. ... I have never read a single source from 1901 who considered Michigan to be the national champion, whereas I have seen many 1901 sources refer to Harvard as such.
  5. ^ "All-America Team of 1901". Spalding's Football Guide: 47. 1902. Retrieved March 8, 2015 – via Google books. open access
  6. ^ Caspar Whitney (1902). "The Sportsman's View-Point" (PDF). Outing.
  7. ^ "Firm In The Line: Harvard Beats Williams, 16 to 0, in First Game". The Boston Sunday Globe. September 29, 1901. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Buck The Line: Harvard Goes Through Bowdoin For Two Touchdowns". The Boston Globe. October 3, 1901. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Scores on Harvard: Bates Get 6 Points to Crimson's 16 Points". The Boston Sunday Globe. October 6, 1901. p. 4 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Blank First Half: Harvard Unable to Cross the Amherst Goal Line". The Boston Sunday Globe. October 10, 1901. p. 4 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Crimson Line In No Danger: Harvard Beats Columbia 18 to 0". The Boston Globe. October 13, 1901. pp. 1–2 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Harvard Slow: Scores Only 16 Points on Weak Wesleyan Eleven". The Boston Sunday Globe. October 17, 1901. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Kernan's Run Saves Harvard: West Point Allows Crimson Only Six Points". The Boston Sunday Globe. October 20, 1901. pp. 1–2 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Indians Dangerous Only Once: By a Run, and a Series of Rushes, They Get Within Harvard's Eight-Yard Line". The Boston Sunday Globe. October 27, 1901. pp. 1–2 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Crimson Triumphs Over Brown by Its Biggest Score of the Season---48---0". Boston Post. November 3, 1901. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Harvard Defeats Pennsylvania By Score Of 33 To 6". The Times (Philadelphia). November 10, 1901. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Fast Football: Harvard Defeats Dartmouth by A Score of 27 to 12". The Boston Globe. November 17, 1901. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ Dudley S. Dean (November 24, 1901). "Harvard 22, Yale 0: Crimson Give the Blue Saddest Surprise in History". The Boston Sunday Globe. pp. 1–2 – via Newspapers.com.